Sheffield ladder climb up Everest

A team of firefighters set themselves the challenge of climbing the height of Mount Everest ' 8,850m / 29,035ft, with money raised going to The Fire Fighters Charity, which supports injured firefighters and their families through emotional and physical trauma. Our picture shows the fundraising firefighters with John Lewis's operations manager Jonathan Liversidge (front row, third left) and Emma Flack (back row, centre), operations manager fashions. The firefighters are, climbing up the ladder, Lee Jones, and, back row, from left, Paul Wood and Dan Jackson; front, Chris Burgin, Darren Staniland and Dave Kiddy.
A team of firefighters set themselves the challenge of climbing the height of Mount Everest ' 8,850m / 29,035ft, with money raised going to The Fire Fighters Charity, which supports injured firefighters and their families through emotional and physical trauma. Our picture shows the fundraising firefighters with John Lewis's operations manager Jonathan Liversidge (front row, third left) and Emma Flack (back row, centre), operations manager fashions. The firefighters are, climbing up the ladder, Lee Jones, and, back row, from left, Paul Wood and Dan Jackson; front, Chris Burgin, Darren Staniland and Dave Kiddy.
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Life as a firefighter has its ups and downs...

Never more so than for crews from Sheffield - who set themselves a city centre charity challenge that would test the calf muscles of a mountain goat.

The firefighters set out to scale one of the brigade’s huge rescue ladders enough times to reach a combined total of 29,035ft - the exact height of Mount Everest.

The aim was to raise cash for the Firefighters Charity.

Lee Jones, crew manager of Green Watch at Low Edges station, took part along with colleagues Paul Wood, Dan Jackson, Chris Burgin, Darren Staniland and Dave Kiddy, from Rivelin and Central stations in Sheffield.

The exhausting feat, which took place in front of the John Lewis store in Barker’s Pool, was watched by passing shoppers from down below.

Afterwards a tired-out Lee said: “It took us five-and-a-half hours - but how many people can say they climbed Everest in that time.

“We raised £600 for the charity, so it was well worthwhile, even though I couldn’t move when I got home and sat down with a takeaway!”

The charity provides help and support for serving and retired firefighters, fire personnel and their families.

Over the years it has helped hundreds of thousands of individuals by providing world-class treatment and services.

But it costs £9 million a year to keep the charity running and, with no government money, it is completely reliant on fundraising and donations.

A spokesman for the charity said: “The role of a firefighter is one of bravery, loyalty and devotion to public service.

“Just like firefighters, we are passionate about our work and the services we provide to the men and women who risk their lives to save ours.”

The charity has three centres, in Cumbria, Devon and West Sussex, which offer support programmes including physical rehabilitation and recuperation.