Sheffield hospital given prize for diabetes care

From left to right: Annie Bain (Academic Pharmacist Practitioner) Cheryl Smith (Diabetes Specialist Nurse, Vanessa Demetriou (Diabetes Support Worker) , Clare Nelson (Inpatient Diabetes Specialist Nurse), Sallianne Kavanagh (Diabetes Pharmacist), Dr Rajiv Gandi (Consultant Physician), Sarah Humphries (Inpatient Diabetes Nurse Specialist), and Dr Jackie Elliott (Senior Clinical Lecturer in Diabetes & Honorary Consultant). The team have won the prestigious Rowan Hillson Insulin Safety Award.
From left to right: Annie Bain (Academic Pharmacist Practitioner) Cheryl Smith (Diabetes Specialist Nurse, Vanessa Demetriou (Diabetes Support Worker) , Clare Nelson (Inpatient Diabetes Specialist Nurse), Sallianne Kavanagh (Diabetes Pharmacist), Dr Rajiv Gandi (Consultant Physician), Sarah Humphries (Inpatient Diabetes Nurse Specialist), and Dr Jackie Elliott (Senior Clinical Lecturer in Diabetes & Honorary Consultant). The team have won the prestigious Rowan Hillson Insulin Safety Award.
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An innovative scheme which helps patients with diabetes continue to inject their own insulin while in hospital has won a highly sought after diabetes prize.

Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust was named as joint winner of the prestigious Rowan Hillson Insulin Safety Award for supporting insulin-treated patients to continue to have safe access to their insulin at all stages of their hospital care.

Sallianne Kavanagh MRPharmS IP, MSc Clinical Pharmacy, lead pharmacist for Sheffield Teaching Hospital’s diabetes and endocrinology teams, said: “We are delighted to have been named joint winners of this prestigious award.”

Working with the diabetes team, the pharmacy team at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation created a dedicated diabetes pharmacist role to support insulin safety in hospital.

The pharmacy then worked closely with the Trust’s Medicines Safety Committee to understand the risks in restricting access to insulin self-management.

Sallianne Kavanagh added: “Diabetes is a lifelong condition and people are taught to monitor their glucose and adjust their insulin doses on an ongoing basis.

“Continuing to do this in a hospital environment has been highlighted as best practice in national guidelines and through this pharmacy-led project we have been able to support this as much as possible.”

The awards are named after Dr Rowan Hillson, who is internationally renowned for her work with people who have diabetes.

They are presented by the Joint Diabetes Societies for Inpatient Care, one of the UK’s leading diabetes societies.

The team, pictured above, was given its award earlier this month.