Sheffield community project continues to grow after organist’s tragic death

Maureen Greaves the widow of murdered church organist Alan Greaves, pictured at her home at High Green, Sheffield.
Maureen Greaves the widow of murdered church organist Alan Greaves, pictured at her home at High Green, Sheffield.
0
Have your say

A community project run by the widow of murdered organist Alan Greaves, is going from strength to strength.

Big-hearted Maureen Greaves and her late husband Alan set up a food bank and shop in High Green just weeks prior to his death in 2012, to help the area’s most needy residents.

Maureen Greaves the widow of murdered church organist Alan Greaves, pictured at her home at High Green, Sheffield.

Maureen Greaves the widow of murdered church organist Alan Greaves, pictured at her home at High Green, Sheffield.

With financial backing from St Saviour’s Church, where Alan played the organ, Maureen and an army of volunteers have worked tirelessly to make the community project a success.

Notable achievements this year include setting up a saving and lending scheme and running a weekly community meal at the church hall for residents of all ages.

And as demand for the project’s services continues, Maureen has big plans for next year too.

“The project has been extremely well used, there are always new people coming along and recommending it to others,” said Maureen.

“Our current furniture shop is quite small and we don’t have much storage so in the new year we hope to find suitable premises in High Green for a bigger shop, in which we can include a coffee area.

“The Chapeltown Methodist Church and connecting churches, including High Green and Warren, have given us £5,000 which will fund decorating and the first four months’ rent and bills - it’s a wonderful gift.”

Maureen, aged 65, has just marked the second anniversary of Alan’s death.

The grandfather-of-two was brutally beaten to death on December 24 2012, as he walked to St Saviour’s to play the organ at the midnight service.

His killers, Ashley Foster and Jonathan Bowling, were jailed for nine years and for life, respectively.

Reflecting on her loss, Maureen said: “It’s been difficult for me going from a very happily married woman to being alone. I miss his companionship.

“I know he would be amazed by everything that has happened at the project. It is a lasting legacy of what he enjoyed doing - helping others.”