Sheffield babysitter jailed for abusing two boys under his care

Alex Green pictured outside Sheffield Crown Court during his earlier trial. He was sentenced to three years in prison for sexually abusing two boys.
Alex Green pictured outside Sheffield Crown Court during his earlier trial. He was sentenced to three years in prison for sexually abusing two boys.
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A Sheffield babysitter who sexually abused two boys under his care in ‘a gross betrayal of trust’ has been jailed for three years.

Sheffield Crown Court was told Alexander Green, aged 31, of Crosspool, was found guilty by majority verdict on 10 counts of sexual assault against two children under the age of 13.

The jury failed to return a unaminous verdict and Judge Paul Watson QC accepted the majority verdict.

In front of a packed public gallery, Kitty Taylor, prosecuting, told the court she did not wish to go over again the sexual abuse Green inflicted on his victims but echoed Judge Paul Watson QC’s comments that Green had betrayed the families’ trust.

The court previously heard Green ‘took advantage’ of his victims while they got ready for bed.

But throughout the trial Green maintained he ‘did nothing wrong’ and his behaviour was ‘appropriate’.

Clare Ashcroft, defending, said: “Any custodial term given is going to have an impact on Mr Green significantly more than the majority of the population.

“This is because of his physical and psychological difficulties.

“He has already received some threats from his time in custody.

“Because of his autism, he doesn’t know where the boundaries lie and this is a reason why he has shown little empathy.”

Judge Paul Watson QC told Green: “This was a gross betrayal of trust.”

He added: “The boys were in your care and you had come to know their parents and they bestowed trust in you. You have broken that trust by sexually assaulting the boys in question, taking advantage of them while they got ready for bed.

“This no doubt will have a long and lasting effect on the boys and their families.

“I have read a very moving victim statements describing the effect it’s had on them.

“I do accept the difficulties you have both physically and mentally and that you are somewhat a lonely young man, who has led an isolated life.”

Judge Watson agreed that Green, who has autism, would find it hard in prison.

He said: “I have read several reports on your difficulties you have and it’s clear you would find prison difficult both physically and psychologically.”

The mother of one of the victims said: “We can now and try to move on. I’m glad that he (Green) can’t do this to anyone else.”