Screwdriver used in fatal attack on Sheffield man, court told

A murder suspects claim that she sat on a sofa with her hands covering her eyes as her partner killed her friend does not match with evidence taken from the scene, a court heard.
A murder suspects claim that she sat on a sofa with her hands covering her eyes as her partner killed her friend does not match with evidence taken from the scene, a court heard.
0
Have your say

A murder suspect’s claim that she sat on a sofa with her hands covering her eyes as her partner killed her friend does not match with evidence taken from the scene, a court heard.

When questioned by police on August 25 last year, the day after Craig Wild was found dead at her Walkley flat, Alison Moss told officers she was sat nearby as David Webster, 50, fatally attacked the 49-year-old.

Moss, of Fox Walk, said she saw ‘blood and arms flying’ and sat on the nearby sofa with her hands covering her eyes while the 15 minute attack took place.

But forensics expert Laura Lewis told Sheffield Crown Court smatterings of blood taken from the murder scene suggest Moss’ account could not have been possible.

In addition, Ms Lewis told Sheffield Crown Court the clothing it is believed Moss, 47, was wearing at the time of Mr Wild’s murder suggests Moss kicked him as he was ‘injured and bleeding’.

She said: “Taking that these items of clothing were used, and the overall smattering of blood, it is in line with Alison Moss having been involved in a dynamic interaction with Craig Wild whilst he was injured and bleeding.

“It alludes to her kicking him with the lower aspect of her right trainer.

“In my opinion this is contrary to her account that she was seated on the sofa with her hands covering her eyes which itself would have caused her own arms to be spattered with a number of drips and pools of blood.”

Ms Lewis also concluded that a black handled kitchen knife, a wooden-handled kitchen knife and a screwdriver were used during the horrific, and ultimately fatal, attack on Mr Wild.

However, due to the large volume of Mr Wild’s blood present on all three of the murder weapons Ms Lewis said it was not possible for traces of anyone else’s DNA to be found on the implements.

Moss denies one count of murder. Second defendant, Webster, of Gibraltar Building, Shalesmoor pleaded guilty to one count of murder at an earlier hearing.

The trial continues.