Rotherham-born William Hague quits in reshuffle

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Rotherham-born politician William Hague has quit as Foreign Secretary as part of the Government reshuffle.

He will also stand down as a Conservative MP for Richmond, after 26 years in the post, at the next general election.

File photo dated 19/03/14 of William Hague who has quit as foreign secretary and will leave the Commons next year as David Cameron wielded the axe to clear the way for a new generation to take places at the Cabinet table. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Monday July 14, 2014. See PA story POLITCS Reshuffle. Photo credit should read: Anthony Devlin/PA Wire

File photo dated 19/03/14 of William Hague who has quit as foreign secretary and will leave the Commons next year as David Cameron wielded the axe to clear the way for a new generation to take places at the Cabinet table. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Monday July 14, 2014. See PA story POLITCS Reshuffle. Photo credit should read: Anthony Devlin/PA Wire

The former Wath-Upon-Dearne Comprehensive school student, who first stood for election in Wentworth in 1987 but was defeated, was praised as ‘one of the leading lights of the Conservative Party for a generation’ by Prime Minister David Cameron.

Mr Hague will replace Andrew Lansley as Leader of the Commons over the next year.

He said he wanted to return on writing and speding time with his family.

He added: “Role as Leader of the House means I will finish in politics as I began – speaking in Parliament and campaigning among the voters.

“From May 2015, after such a long period in politics I want to embark on many other things I have always wanted to do.

“Renewal in politics is good, and holding office is not an end in itself.

“After 26 years as an MP time will be right for me to move on.”

Sir Bob Kerslake, the former chief executive of Sheffield Council, has also announced his plan to step down as head of the home civil service in the autumn after two and a half years in the role.

He will retire as permanent secretary of the Department for Communities and Local Government in February 2015.

The role of head of the home civil service will be handed to Downing Street’s top official, Cabinet Secretary Sir Jeremy Heywood.

The decision marks the end of a two-year trial in which the civil service leadership was split between the two.

 

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