Road closure hits traders

Following a landslide earlier in the week, Glossop Road appears very quiet as the road is closed in one direction
Following a landslide earlier in the week, Glossop Road appears very quiet as the road is closed in one direction
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A NORMALLY thriving Sheffield shopping street lies deserted.

This was the scene yesterday afternoon on Glossop Road, Broomhill - a thoroughfare usually busy with traffic and bustling with pedestrians.

The collapse of a pavement, roadside wall and embankment a few hundred yards downhill at the King Edward VII School site has meant the road is open only one way - and all bus services have been diverted on another route.

Traders on Glossop Road say the disruption is a further blow as they struggle to recover from the introduction of parking charges two years ago.

Hong Thitran, who works at salon Nail Decor, said: “Yesterday morning we had only one customer and on Wednesday there were only three.

“The road closure is definitely putting people off from coming up here.”

Manoj Beeharj, who runs a tailor’s shop next door, added: “It’s affecting people coming in to be measured up and collect orders, and the road outside is very quiet.”

Another shopkeeper, who did not wish to be named, said: “The road closure and lack of buses means there is little passing trade. We’ve previously had problems with the parking charges putting off business and we are still recovering from that.

“This problem is another blow for us.”

Bus passengers said they were unhappy about a lack of information at stops informing them the 120 service, which normally runs every few minutes, had been diverted.

One woman said: “I was waiting for a bus into town for half an hour and there were no signs to say what was going on. Notices should have been put up more quickly.”

Signs are now being erected at bus stops by South Yorkshire Passenger Transport Executive to inform passengers that the 120 service is running via Whitham Road and Brook Hill roundabout instead.

A Sheffield Council spokeswoman said an investigation and repairs to the pavement will take a week to complete.

She added it is too early to say whether work on a new block at the school, close to the embankment, may have contributed to the collapse.

Local people said contractors Vinci had excavated a section of the embankment which carries Glossop Road around 30ft above the ground on which the school stands.

The secondary school is in the latter stages of a £22 million revamp.