Riders rev up to take anti-fracking fight to the streets

Nellie the No Fracking Way Patterdale took part in the ride. Pics: Ruth Hare
Nellie the No Fracking Way Patterdale took part in the ride. Pics: Ruth Hare
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Riders got their motors running on Saturday for a ride to bring awareness to their anti-fracking campaign in villages near the border of South Yorkshire and Derbyshire.

About 30 people saddled up for a ride around some of the villages under threat from shale gas drilling operations.

Riders made their way around villages in Derbyshire to raise awareness of the fight against fracking. Pics: Ruth Hare

Riders made their way around villages in Derbyshire to raise awareness of the fight against fracking. Pics: Ruth Hare

They tooted their horns and revved the engines to be heard, while the high-visibility vests they were wearing ensured the riders who took part were seen.

They rode Harley Davidsons, BMWs, Nortons and Triumphs, and even the odd scooter rider took part.

The riders undertook a 40-mile course taking in the villages including Marsh Lane, Ridgeway, Clowne, Barlborough, Stavely, Barrow HIll, Dronfield and Coal Aston.

They handed out leaflets to passers-by at Harthill. Ride organiser Margaret Riley, who rode with husband David, said a lot of people weren't aware of the fracking threat.

"It was nice to raise awareness," she said.

"So many people know nothing.

"It was nice going around the villages.

"Lots of people were cheering us around."

They gathered at the Fox and Hounds, Marsh Lane, for refreshments and to take donations for their cause.

Mrs Riley described the ride as 'a success' on the awareness front.

"The fact that we could do quite a few miles in such a short space of time," she said.

"It allowed us to get the message out there."

Riders were instructed to give their horns extra honks when they approached Bramley Moor Lane, in Marsh Lane.

It is one of the proposed fracking sites by chemical firm Ineos.

"We'e so frightened," Mrs Riley, who lives at Chandos Crescent, Killamarsh, said.

"We're fighting for our grandchildren to breathe fresh air.

"I can't believe I'm having to say this: Fighting for our grandchildren to breathe fresh air."

Mrs Riley said she believed the process would take place too close to the village.

"Three hundred and fifty yards from people's homes," she said.

The situation was 'very worrying', Mrs Riley said.

The riders roped in a canine friend to help them raise awareness.

Nellie the Patterdale donned the goggles and jumped aboard one of the bikes for the ride.

"I'm calling her Nellie the No-Fracking Way Patterdale," Mrs Riley said.