Retro: Sheffield suburb was Pulp star’s birthplace

Intake Primary school, where the Cess Team is seen with board and trophies. Standing LtoR are, Joe Palmer, Nicholas McIlroy, Shaun Boldock, Liam Staniland, Adam Richardson and Joe Paramore. Seated are Ian Gragory and Sarah Hutchinson. LtoR are Dep Head Peter Lowry, and Head Nev Wheeler.
Intake Primary school, where the Cess Team is seen with board and trophies. Standing LtoR are, Joe Palmer, Nicholas McIlroy, Shaun Boldock, Liam Staniland, Adam Richardson and Joe Paramore. Seated are Ian Gragory and Sarah Hutchinson. LtoR are Dep Head Peter Lowry, and Head Nev Wheeler.
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Whoops, we skipped on to Jordanthorpe last week in our Retro A to Z of Sheffield and surrounding areas, when really it was the turn of Intake.

It’s probably most famous these days as the birthplace of Jarvis Cocker, leader of the band Pulp.

For Libraries week. 'Intake Primary School get their heads into their books for libraries week. Left to right are, 10 year old Charlotte Brown, headteacher Mrs Elizabeth Paver and Curtis Brown, also aged 10.

For Libraries week. 'Intake Primary School get their heads into their books for libraries week. Left to right are, 10 year old Charlotte Brown, headteacher Mrs Elizabeth Paver and Curtis Brown, also aged 10.

He spent his first 18 years living in Intake with his mum and sister and set up the band, first called Arabicus Pulp, while he was a pupil at Intake School.

The band used to practise at his family home on Mansfield Road.

It’s strange to think that this suburb in south Sheffield used to be a pit village.

There were once seven collieries in total in that part of Sheffield, mining the Silkstone seam.

Pictured at the newly  re-furbished pub The Royal Oak, Mansfield Road, Intake, where land lord Billy Margetts is seen at the bar.

Pictured at the newly re-furbished pub The Royal Oak, Mansfield Road, Intake, where land lord Billy Margetts is seen at the bar.

Apparently the pits 
including Intake attracted workers to what had been an agricultural area from all over the country.

Before the deep mine shafts were sunk the coal was worked in a bell pit.

An explosion at Intake claimed seven lives in July 1822.

By 1898 the Sheffield Coal Company employed more than 2,500 men in the area, producing more than 6,000 tons of coal each week.

The collieries boosted industries such as brick making, quarrying and saw the creation of chemical works at nearby Normanton Spring.

As the area’s population expanded, the decision waas taken to set up a board school in Intake which opened in September 1884. Board schools were the first state-run schools.

The new schoo lwas run by a headteacher, an assistant and a pupil teacher.

According to a history of the school written on its centenary, the head JH Oliver recorded that some of the first pupils were in “a frightful state of ignorance”.

By 1935 Intake boasted its own tram terminus until the service itself terminated in 1956.

Intake also had the last remaining suburban cinema, The Rex, which stood on Mansfield Road at its junction with Hollybank Road. It opened in 1939 and was owned by Miss Dorothy Ward.

The first film it showed was with Men with Wings, which starred Fred MacMurray and Ray Milland as two aviation pioneers.

The Rex closed on December 23, 1982 after showing Chariots of Fire and Gregory’s Girl. The building was demolished a year later.

Jarvis Cocker has written about visiting The Rex and how, if a film had surround sound, the management just turned the sound up loud.