Replica bench unveiled to mark centenary of Derwent Dam - practice site of the Dam Buster raids

Liv Garfield, chief executive officer of Severn Trent, and behind Severn Trent teams and Peak District representatives.
Liv Garfield, chief executive officer of Severn Trent, and behind Severn Trent teams and Peak District representatives.
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A celebration event was staged to mark the centenary of a dam which has provided water to Sheffield and the surrounding areas for 100 years.

Severn Trent’s Derwent Dam in the Upper Derwent Valley - which provides water to Sheffield, Derby, Nottingham and Leicester - was opened in 1916 without much fanfare as the country was embroiled in the First World War.

So this year the company made an extra special effort to highlight the centenary and staff created a new bench to mark the occasion, which has been specifically designed to replicate the design of the dam.

Hazel Earnshaw, site supervisor at Upper Derwent Valley, said: “We are delighted to be marking a major milestone for one of our most momentous sites, as we celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Derwent Dam.

“It’s such a beautiful, picturesque place that proudly serves over half a million customers across the midlands. It’s also surrounded by a wealth of history and we hope that its legacy lives on for many more years to come. We decided to create a bench to mark the occasion and provide a resting spot for visitors. It really is such a focal point of the Valley and now people can to take a seat and admire the Dam in all its glory.”

Between 1903 and 1910 the Derwent Valley Water Board extracted a staggering 1.2 million tons of stone to construct the dams at Derwent and Howden.

It took more than 1,000 people to build it, with the stone used coming from Bole Hill, a nearby quarry above Grindleford. The site is steeped in history with the dam best known for being used as a practice area for the Dam Buster raids during the Second World War.