Project to improve Sheffield moorland habitats

Walkabout: Richard Benyon, Sir John Lawton, John Mothersole, of Sheffield Council, and the National Trust's Becky Speight. PICTURE: STEVE ELLIS
Walkabout: Richard Benyon, Sir John Lawton, John Mothersole, of Sheffield Council, and the National Trust's Becky Speight. PICTURE: STEVE ELLIS
0
Have your say

A £400,000 project has been launched to encourage wildlife to ‘thrive’ on moorland on the outskirts of Sheffield.

The Sheffield Moors Partnership – made up of the National Trust, Sheffield Wildlife Trust, Sheffield Council and RSPB – covers moorland around Burbage and Longshaw and is proposing to improve footpaths, environmental education, and increase the number of volunteers.

Enviroment Minister Richard Benyon MP,visits Sheffield Moors at The Longshaw Estate.

Enviroment Minister Richard Benyon MP,visits Sheffield Moors at The Longshaw Estate.

Environment minister Richard Benyon and Professor Sir John Lawton, who led a Government review of England’s protected areas, were invited to the launch at the National Trust’s Moorlands Discovery Centre.

Mr Benyon said: “I’d like to see more and more people getting out and about and enjoying England’s beauty spots, like the Sheffield Moors. This long-term plan will improve paths to give people better access to Sheffield Moors’ diverse habitats, while additional visitors will help to grow the local economy.”

The Sheffield Moors cover 21 square miles of moorland, meadows, bogs, deciduous woodlands and gritstone edges such as the iconic Stanage Edge.

The moors boast a wealth of wildlife, including one of two red deer herds in the Peak and its only colony of adders.