Prisoner unrest at riot jail ‘unheeded’

CREDIT - Jonathan Pow / rossparry.co.uk''Riot officers arriving at Moorland Prison (Closed) and Young Offenders Institute, Lindholme, South Yorkshire.
CREDIT - Jonathan Pow / rossparry.co.uk''Riot officers arriving at Moorland Prison (Closed) and Young Offenders Institute, Lindholme, South Yorkshire.
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RIOTS at a Doncaster jail last year were caused by ‘less than effective’ management rather than gang warfare, according to the latest internal report into the incidents.

A Prison Service report, which is not being published in full, into three consecutive nights of destruction at Moorland Prison and Young Offenders’ Institution says wider problems were to blame.

The riots in November 2010 cost more than £1 million because of the amount of damage caused by rampaging inmates who smashed up cells, took hostages and aimed missiles at officers.

Police are still carrying out a detailed investigation into the riots and have identified up to 100 suspects, although none have so far been charged.

Initially it was suggested rival gangs from either side of the Pennines had been stoking up resentment which led to the violence.

After prison riot squad officers took back control of Moorland, senior officer Danny McAllister was sent to investigate the rioting. In his report he says: “There is no evidence to suggest that high levels of collusion between prisoners played a part in the disturbances. Neither can ‘gang related’ dynamics be cited as the cause.

“Rather, the events which took place illuminate a picture of a prison without a good enough grasp of the procedural, dynamic and human factors at work in maintaining order and decently focused control.

“This less than effective operating environment allowed the signs and symbols of prisoner unrest to accumulate and go unheeded.”

A Prison Service spokesman said: “The report into Moorland produced a series of recommendations which the National Offender Management Service has accepted and is implementing.”