Pride in our schools: Creative pupils with a sense of growing

School feature at Waterthorpe Nursery Infants School. Pictured is Madeline Cartwright.
School feature at Waterthorpe Nursery Infants School. Pictured is Madeline Cartwright.
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Waterthorpe Nursery Infant School is on School Thorpe Drive, Waterthrope.

It is a part of the Westfield family of schools – a group of 10 schools in the south-east of the city.

The schools – Westfield, Waterthorpe NI, Emmanuel J, Beighton NI, Brook House J, Halfway NI, Halfway J, Shortbrook, Reignhead and Mosborough – work closely on a range of projects.

School feature at Waterthorpe Nursery Infants School. Pictured with their recorders are Krystyna Biegala, six, and Caleb Brown, seven.

School feature at Waterthorpe Nursery Infants School. Pictured with their recorders are Krystyna Biegala, six, and Caleb Brown, seven.

Waterthorpe Nursery Infant is part of a complex that houses its infant nursery school, a junior school, a church and community rooms that are accessed by a range of groups.

Singing festival

Youngsters have been showing off their musical skills by taking part in a Singing Festival.

Dozens of pupils from the Westfield Family of Schools took part including all of the Waterthorpe NI’s year two pupils.

School feature at Waterthorpe Nursery Infants School. Pictured is Finlay Cartwright, seven.

School feature at Waterthorpe Nursery Infants School. Pictured is Finlay Cartwright, seven.

The children worked hard to learn songs and then performed them for staff and families.

The project was helped by a team at the Sheffield Music Hub.

Seven-year-old Finlay Cartwright said: “We practised the songs in school.

“My favourites were Tick Tock and the Freedom Train. We had to practise at home as well whenever we had spare time.”

Writers of the winning poem from Waterthorpe Nursery Infant School.

Writers of the winning poem from Waterthorpe Nursery Infant School.

His twin sister Madeline added: “My auntie helped me practise things. She used to play music all over the country.”

The musical theme continued for the youngsters when Year 2 pupils performed at the Crucible Theatre.

Pupils were equipped with shiny new recorders to practise with, before they joined musicians from Ensemble 360 to perform a specially adapted performance of Music in the Round’s Chimpanzees of Happy Town.

Finlay said: “The teachers brought in the songs which they had learnt and taught them us in class.

“It was really fun.”

Madeline added: “There were three easy songs and a hard one.”

Council conference

Members of the school council visited Rother Valley Country Park for the Westfield Schools Council Conference.

Children took part in a variety of games and activities including blindfold football.

Finlay, who is on the school council, said: “Pupils from the Westfield Schools were there taking part in the activities. Before we went we were planning it out.

“We had one game with a parachute where you had to keep all the balls in it without dropping them.”

Seven-year-old Caleb Brown said: “We played blindfold football. There was a bell in the ball and it’s like football. You have your eyes covered and you follow the noise of the ball.

“We also climbed some trees.”

Finlay added: “There was another game when we had a box of wood and they would be blindfolded and you would guide them and say when to pick each piece up and when to put it down.”

Clean-up scheme

Pupils worked hard on a project to reduce the amount of dog dirt in the area around the school.

Dog mess had been identified as a problem in a community improvement consultation which was held among all the pupils, parents and staff in the family of schools.

Caleb said: “We did a survey about dog dirt and had to think about how to stop it.

“We went into the woods and around the school and noticed that there was a lot.”

Youngsters were supported by Melinda Guthrie, from Amey, who visited the school to talk to children about how to approach the problem.

A competition was run across the schools for pupils to produce poems and posters. Waterthorpe NI pupils won the poetry competition, while Beighton NI won the top poster prize.

Finlay said: “We put some signs up around the school to try and make less people do it.”

Road safety first

Year 2 youngsters learnt all about crossing the road and where are safe places to cross.

Staff from logistics company Gist visited the school with a lorry and parked it in the playground.

They discovered how drivers of big vehicles can often not see children, despite youngsters being able to see them.

Krystyna Biegala, aged six, said: “We have to look left and right and see if it is safe to cross. A lorry came into the playground. At the end we got stickers that said be safe, be seen.”

Caleb added: “We went into the lorry to take a picture. Someone pressed the horn and made some of the children cry because it was so loud.”

Forest grounds

The school has a Forest School nestled in its grounds which provides an outdoor learning area for children.

It opened in 2008 and youngsters have used it for exciting activities this year.

Finlay said: “We have been looking for clues to see if dinosaurs had been around. Me and Riley saw this rock and this white thing which we thought might have been a tooth, but it was squidgy.”

The Forest School also has a garden area that has inspired pupils in poetry.

n Next week: Outwood Academy City