Police rev up action on off-road bikes

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Police are cracking down on rogue off-road motorbikers following concerns from disgruntled residents in Armthorpe.

Officers in the local police team have made the issue one of their top priorities for the coming weeks and have upped their patrols in the area.

Bikes have been spotted roaring through areas around Barton Lane and Fair Holme View.

Armthorpe Coun Chris McGuinness said: “I think the problem is they are usually in places that they clearly shouldn’t be. My view is there’s a time and a place for everything but using public footpaths and rights of way for riding motorbikes and quad bikes is not acceptable.

“This has been a problem in the past and police have put extra patrols on. There has been quite a bit of police activity.

“We are aware that the police have manned a number of patrols and activities in recent times to address the problems.”

The off-road motorbike issue was agreed as a priority at Wednesday’s Partners and Communities Together meeting in the village.

Concerns were raised back in May that the bikes were becoming ‘an increasing problem’ and police responded by launching an operation in partnership with staff from Doncaster Council on June 15 and 16 from 9am to 7pm both days.

A police spokesman said: “Two reports of motorcycle nuisance were received from residents. A total of four Police Reform Act warning notices were served on individual riders of motorcycles during the day.

“The operation was repeated the following day. No reports were received and staff did not come across any off road motorcycles whilst on patrol.”

Further reports were made to police on June 19 and 23 - one in Barton Lane and one in Fair Holme View. However, both times the culprits had moved on by the time officers made a search.

The spokesman added: “Staff have monitored this and it has now been agreed to adopt this as a priority.”

Riding motor vehicles on common land or wasteland is almost always illegal.

The only place off-road bikes can be lawfully ridden is on private land with the direct permission of the landowner, or at an organised, supervised off-road centre.

Riders should always wear full protective clothing and a secure helmet.