Plaque unveiled on street for Sheffield war hero

Christine Spencer, Lord Lieutenant, Lord Mayor, Graham White and David Titterton Garnham unveil a plaque in memory of Arnold Loosemore, on Loosemore Drive, Norton. Picture: Andrew Roe
Christine Spencer, Lord Lieutenant, Lord Mayor, Graham White and David Titterton Garnham unveil a plaque in memory of Arnold Loosemore, on Loosemore Drive, Norton. Picture: Andrew Roe
0
Have your say

A new memorial plaque commemorating a Sheffield war hero has been installed on a street named after him.

Loosemore Drive in Gleadless Common was named after Sergeant Arnold Loosemore in the early 1980s.

A plaque was installed beneath the road sign reminding residents of Sgt Loosemore’s bravery during World War One.

Sgt Loosemore won the Victoria Cross for bravery after he single-handedly killed more than 20 German soldiers to save his platoon.

But over the years the plaque was repeatedly vandalised and eventually stolen.

Now two Sheffield friends, Graham White and David Titterton Garnham, from Millhouses, have had a new plaque made by Brass Founders of Sheffield to ensure Sgt Loosemore’s memory lives on.

The plaque was officially unveiled in a special ceremony by the Lord Mayor of Sheffield, Coun Peter Rippon and David Moody, the Lord Lieutenant of South Yorkshire.

Sgt Loosemore was a 21-year-old private in August 1917 when his platoon was held up by heavy machine gun fire during an attack on a German position near Ypres, Belgium.

Immediately afterwards his Lewis gun was blown up and three enemy rushed for him - but he shot them all with his revolver.

Later, he shot several enemy snipers, exposing himself to heavy fire, and brought back a wounded comrade.

In 1918, he was awarded a Distinguished Conduct Medal for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty at Zillebeke, Belgium.

Earlier this year, Dr White and Mr Titterton Garnham, along with friend Alan Watson, also of Millhouses, had three plaques made to help guide visitors to Sgt Loosemore’s grave in All Saints Parish Church, Ecclesall.

The plaques, which were donated by Brass Founders of Sheffield, point visitors from the church door to the grave.

The trio found it difficult to locate Sgt Loosemore’s grave after discovering he was buried close to where they lived and so had the plaques made. They hope their installation will enable more people, especially those from younger generations, to learn about him.

Dr White said: We hope that all people, especially young people, will get to know the sacrifices made by this amazing man.”