Pink bales add a splash of colour at Doncaster farm as part of cancer charity fundraising campaign

MS & TJ Farming at Red House Farm, High Melton are wrapping their hay bales in pink to raise money for Weston Park Cancer Trust. Picture: Andrew Roe
MS & TJ Farming at Red House Farm, High Melton are wrapping their hay bales in pink to raise money for Weston Park Cancer Trust. Picture: Andrew Roe
0
Have your say

It looks like a stack of giant marshmallows - but this colourful collection is actually a unique way of raising money for a cancer charity in honour of a brave woman who is battling the disease.

Farming siblings Michael and Tom Woolhouse are wrapping their hay bales in pink plastic covering as a show of support for their pal Jane Thorpe, who is fighting breast cancer.

Michael Woolhouse, of MS & TJ Farming at Red House Farm, High Melton are wrapping their hay bales in pink to raise money for Weston Park Cancer Trust. Picture: Andrew Roe

Michael Woolhouse, of MS & TJ Farming at Red House Farm, High Melton are wrapping their hay bales in pink to raise money for Weston Park Cancer Trust. Picture: Andrew Roe

Michael, 26, and Tom, 23, chose pink as the colour is often used to symbolise fundraising events for breast cancer charities.

The big-hearted duo have covered about 80 stacks in the colourful covering at Red House Farm in High Melton, which they will sell on to the equine industry.

They plan to donate £4 from every sale to Weston Park Hospital Cancer Charity in Sheffield, where Jane, aged in her 30s, has been receiving cancer treatment.

Michael said: “I think everyone is touched by cancer in some way at some stage in their lives. Jane is so brave, she is a real fighter.

Michael Woolhouse, of MS & TJ Farming at Red House Farm, High Melton are wrapping their hay bales in pink to raise money for Weston Park Cancer Trust. Picture: Andrew Roe

Michael Woolhouse, of MS & TJ Farming at Red House Farm, High Melton are wrapping their hay bales in pink to raise money for Weston Park Cancer Trust. Picture: Andrew Roe

“We just wanted to show our support and to help raise money for the hospital, which is a great cause and provides vital care.”

He added: “It’s not something you expect to see on a farm. But hopefully we can do our bit to help people who are battling cancer. I’m hoping we can raise about £400 at least.”

The bales have been provided by agricultural firm Volac as part of their own campaign to support Breast Cancer Awareness.

Battler Jane made headlines last month when it was revealed she has spent the last couple of years building her dream home with the help of family and friends while receiving chemotherapy.

Doctors told her the cancer was incurable in 2013, but since then she has built up a five-bedroom home in Ulley, Rotherham, which is just about complete.

She declined to comment or have her picture taken this week, saying she wanted the article to focus on the fundraising farm.

Lucy King, community fundraiser at Weston Park Hospital, said: “We are incredibly grateful to Tom and Michael for thinking of such a quirky way to raise funds for the cancer charity.

“Money raised will go towards supporting over 75,000 cancer patients across the region and helping to improve the vital cancer services provided by Weston Park Hospital.

“We are continually overwhelmed by the creative efforts our fundraisers go to, to ensure our crucial support of the hospital can continue.”