PICTURE: Red ‘supermoon’ in skies over South Yorkshire and North Lincolnshire

A blood red "supermoon" in the skies above Falkirk, created from a lunar eclipse with the moon near to its closest point to the Earth. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Monday September 28, 2015. During a lunar eclipse, the moon turns a deep rusty red, due to sunlight being scattered by the Earth's atmosphere. See PA story SCIENCE Moon. Photo credit should read: Danny Lawson/PA Wire
A blood red "supermoon" in the skies above Falkirk, created from a lunar eclipse with the moon near to its closest point to the Earth. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Monday September 28, 2015. During a lunar eclipse, the moon turns a deep rusty red, due to sunlight being scattered by the Earth's atmosphere. See PA story SCIENCE Moon. Photo credit should read: Danny Lawson/PA Wire
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A blood red “supermoon” appeared in the in the skies above South Yorkshire for the first time in 30 years today.

The eerie light created from a lunar eclipse with the moon near to its closest point to the Earth delighted amateur astronomers.

The spectacle was in the early hours, with the “total” phase - when the moon is completely in shadow - lasting from 3.11am to 4.24am, ending when the moon left the Earth’s shadow at 6.24am.

When the moon is at perigee, its shortest distance from the Earth, it is 226,000 miles away and appears 14% larger and 30% brighter than when it is at its furthermost point.

The last time this coincided with a lunar eclipse, when the moon is covered by the Earth’s shadow, was in 1982 and the event will not be repeated until 2033.

During a lunar eclipse, the moon turns a deep rusty red, due to sunlight being scattered by the Earth’s atmosphere.