Pair jailed over sex trafficking

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TWO men who trafficked women into the country to work as sex slaves, including a victim rebuilding her life in Sheffield, have been jailed for a total of 27 years.

The father and son team, Bogdan and Marius Nejloveanu, aged 51 and 23, tricked five vulnerable young women from Romania into the UK with the promise of a new home and jobs.

Their victims, including one now living in Sheffield after being offered support from a city charity, were “threatened, beaten and degraded” and forced to sell their bodies for money.

They were forced to work in brothels in Birmingham and Manchester.

Marius Nejloveanu repeatedly raped two of the women and forced them into “grossly humiliating” sexual acts for his own amusement, Manchester Crown Court heard.

Marius was jailed for 21 years after being convicted of 27 counts including four rapes, trafficking, assault and controlling prostitution.

His father was jailed for six years after being convicted of seven charges, including sex trafficking and controlling prostitution between November 2007 and October 2008.

Their illegal business earned them thousands of pounds.

One of the victims, who has since been offered refuge in Sheffield by a charity which works with vulnerable women, was trafficked into the UK in 2008 after a friend introduced her to Marius.

He confiscated her passport and phone, held her hostage and forced her to have sex with men. He would beat her up if she refused.

She was put on a bus with a fake passport and driven to Birmingham where she was forced to work as a prostitute and hand over her earnings to her captors.

Her family in Romania had reported her missing to police and feared she was dead.

She was found when police raided a sauna in Manchester, where she was being forced to work.

Det Chf Supt Mary Doyle, of Greater Manchester Police, said: “Marius and Bogdan Nejloveanu effectively ran a family business specialising in sexual slavery and I am delighted they have received their come-uppance.

“While their world is a dark and sinister one that involves the exploitation of vulnerable and impressionable girls looking for a better life, it also brings into question the role of the men who slept with these women and who fuelled the Nejloveanus’ appalling trade.

“This case goes beyond the topic of legalising prostitution but does bring into question the responsibilities of those who use brothels and the services of sex workers.”