ON THIS DAY: 1889: Sheffield United are formed - by the chairman of Sheffield Wednesday - PICTURES AND VIDEO

The Sheffield United team of 1889.
The Sheffield United team of 1889.
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Exactly 128 years ago today, Sheffield United came into being for the very first time - but did you know that it was a Sheffield Wednesday supporter who got the ball rolling on the club?

It was on 22 March 1889 at the Adelphi Hotel - now the site of the Crucible Theatre - that a decision was taken to form a football club.

A cricket club had been going at Bramall Lane since 1854 and it was at the suggestion of the cricket club president Sir Charles Clegg that a football club should also be formed.

Clegg, a famous local sportsman, chairman of the Sheffield FA and also chairman of Sheffield Wednesday was thus credited with bringing the Blades into existence and later went on to become Chairman and later President of the English FA.

The Wednesday had moved from Bramall Lane to their own ground at Olive Grove, and the tenants of Bramall Lane needed to create a new team to generate income.

It has been suggested that some of The Blades' original players came from an earlier amateur side called Norfolk F.C., who played in the Youdan Cup.

The Adelphi Hotel where Sheffield United were formed.

The Adelphi Hotel where Sheffield United were formed.

The team was formed six days after a crowd of 22,688 paid to watch the FA Cup semi-final played at Bramall Lane between Preston North End and West Bromwich Albion, with gate receipts of £574.

Charles Stokes, a member of the Ground Committee saw the financial possibilities of a permanent football team and they were a professional club almost from the start.

They played their first game against Notts Rangers of the Midland Counties League on 7 September 1889 losing 4–1 at Meadow Lane.

Their first game at Bramall Lane did not come until 28 September 1889 against Birmingham St George's of the Football Alliance which they also lost 4–0.

Sir Charles Clegg, chairman of The Wednesday was behind the formation of Sheffield United.

Sir Charles Clegg, chairman of The Wednesday was behind the formation of Sheffield United.

United's first season was composed of friendlies and local cup matches, but notable for them reaching the second round of the FA Cup at their first attempt by beating Football League side Burnley 2–1 at home. However, the next cup game against Bolton Wanderers gave United their record defeat 13–0 and persuaded the committee that regular competitive league games were required.

They joined the Midland Counties League for the 1890–91 season, finishing fifth.

This season was the first time that the club introduced a red stripe to their shirts, having played their first season in all-white shirts and blue shorts.

Unhappy at being overlooked for the Football Alliance and no longer satisfied with the Midland, they then competed the following season in the Northern League finishing third.

The birthplace of Sheffield United is now occupied by the Crucible.

The birthplace of Sheffield United is now occupied by the Crucible.

At the end of the season they applied to join the Football League First Division, which was expanding from 14 to 16 clubs for the 1892 season, but polled only 5 votes and were instead admitted as one of the twelve founder members of the Second Division.

Both United and Wednesday shared the Blades nickname in the early days - and the pair would be differentiated by the grounds they played at, United being known as Laneites and Wednesday Groveites after their stadium at Olive Grove.

In 1907, Wednesday came to be referred to as The Owls, in reference to their new ground in Owlerton, meaning that United could claim the "Blades" nickname for themselves.