No case to answer for police over complaints by Ian Watkins’ former partner, IPCC rules

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Two detectives who investigated disgraced rock star Ian Watkins have a case to answer for misconduct - but there are no issues relating to a complaint against police made by his former partner, Doncaster-based Joanne Mjadzelics.

Watkins was jailed for 35 years for a string of sex offences including the attempted rape of a baby.

Mjadzelics was cleared of possessing child abuse images in court in January.

She lodged a complaint against Bedfordshire Police claiming that the force failed to protect an 18-month-old infant, known as Child A.

The IPCC investigation into Bedfordshire Police began in January last year after the force received a complaint from Ms Mjadzelics, Watkins’ former partner.

It was concluded that neither officer has a case to answer in respect of Ms Mjadzelics’s complaint that they failed to protect an 18-month-old infant, Child A.

The investigation found that Bedfordshire Police acted promptly to investigate Ms Mjadzelics’s allegation that the child’s mother, referred to Miss A by the IPCC, was allowing Watkins to sexually abuse her child.

IPCC commissioner Jan Williams said: “Bedfordshire Police officers did respond in a timely way to the allegation made by Joanne Mjadzelics in 2012, and demonstrably had the welfare of Miss A’s child uppermost in their minds.”

But the IPCC did find a case to answer in relation to the way police investigated Watkins.

Two detectives who investigated an allegation of child abuse involving disgraced rock star Ian Watkins have a case to answer for misconduct for not pursuing all reasonable lines of inquiry, the police watchdog has ruled.

The IPCC found that Bedfordshire Police took immediate steps to investigate an allegation of child abuse involving the former Lostprophets frontman in 2012 and to safeguard a child.

However, the IPCC recommended that two detectives have a case to answer for misconduct for not complying with force policy on recording decision-making, and not pursuing all reasonable lines of inquiry.

Jan Williams added: “Nothing was found by our investigation to say the force could definitely have prevented any offending, or contributed to bringing Ian Watkins to justice sooner.

“However, there were some more investigative steps detectives could have taken, including the earlier seizure and analysis of electronic equipment belonging to Miss A.

“The two officers subject to the IPCC investigation stated that they did not believe there were grounds to seize Miss A’s devices, and it is regrettable that they failed to document their decision-making in this regard.”

The IPCC found the detective constable and the supervising sergeant did not progress the investigation adequately.

Miss A was arrested on November 21 2012 as a result of inquiries by South Wales Police into Watkins’s online activity.

The IPCC has agreed with Bedfordshire Police’s decision that the two detectives should receive management action.

There are continuing investigations into South Wales and South Yorkshire Police over their handling of allegations against Watkins.

Miss A and another woman entered guilty pleas to a number of sexual offences.