New design for holiday homes

ewdenram'Pictured are houses on Pheasant Lane,Ewden Village,that have built without planing permission.USE ONLY AFTER PICTURES ARE CHECKED BY RICHARD MARSDEN.
ewdenram'Pictured are houses on Pheasant Lane,Ewden Village,that have built without planing permission.USE ONLY AFTER PICTURES ARE CHECKED BY RICHARD MARSDEN.
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A DEVELOPER ordered to pull down luxury holiday cottages at a Sheffield beauty spot after they were built a foot too high is now proposing to ‘remodel’ the half-built properties – as bungalows.

Eric Lidster has been rebuilding old wooden houses at Ewden village, on the edge of the Peak District, as stone properties which he hoped to rent out to tourists.

He bought the plots with planning permission already obtained by previous owner Yorkshire Water in 2006.

But last year, Sheffield Council decided the four homes, on Pheasant Lane, off New Mill Bank, ‘exceeded the approved height and footprint’ and issued an enforcement notice ordering him to bulldoze the cottages and grass over the sites.

Mr Lidster, who runs a plant and machinery hire business in Barnsley, was ordered to demolish two homes the council says were built in the wrong place and two others the council says were not built in line with planning permission granted to the previous owner. He lost an appeal against the decision.

But Mr Lidster took up the council’s offer of coming up with a revised design, which has now been recommended for approval.

He is proposing to remodel the two-storey buildings as bungalows – in line with the wooden properties which used to stand in the area.

Mr Lidster’s proposals are set to be given the green light at a meeting of Sheffield Council’s west and north planning board on Tuesday. A report to councillors, which recommends approval, said: “The details of the development are to retain three of the partially-completed dwellings in situ, involving remodelling of the buildings’ external appearance, and to demolish and re-site the fourth unit in accordance with the scheme approved in 2006.

“Although it is accepted that the buildings would stand taller than the approved scheme and have a larger footprint, the proposal to remodel the buildings to form bungalows is considered acceptable and would not materially affect the open character of the green belt.”

Mr Lidster, who has previously said his original designs were of ‘high quality and not detrimental to the area’ was not available for comment.