New anti-HS2 groups to be created to battle revised route

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New anti-HS2 campaign groups are set to be created across South Yorkshire and North Derbyshire following the high-speed train line route being revised.

Dozens of people from areas on the planned new route attended a meeting arranged by the Killamarsh and Renishaw HS2 Action Group, which has campaigned on the issue for three years.

Killamarsh and Renishaw are no longer on the planned route after HS2 bosses scrapped plans for a new station in Meadowhall in favour of a ‘spur’ into Sheffield city centre.

But the action group has now promised to help others on the revised route running from the Mansfield area up to Wakefield and encouraged those attending the event to set up their own campaigns to try and save their homes and businesses from potential demolition.

Peter Howarth, chair of the Killamarsh and Renishaw group, told around 50 people at the Killamarsh Leisure Centre: “Our common goal is getting this thing stopped.”

He added: “It is quite important that people in other areas form groups, take action as a group. Individuals are fine but they are only one voice.

“You can’t fight a battle if you are running around like headless chickens.”

He said committees should be set up, local MPs lobbied and petitions started.

Russ Beal, vice-chair of the group, said analysis of the new route suggests that along with the entire Shimmer housing estate in Mexborough, eight Grade II listed buildings, eight farms, several residential developments and over 10 businesses are on the route and face potential demolition should the new plans be approved later this year.

He said: “All in all, it is a bad do for everybody involved.”

Mr Beal said the new route is due to pass through or close to places including the Saw Pit Industrial Estate at Tibshelf, Bolsover, Barlbrough, Aston, Bramley, Wales and Mexborough.

He said of the Shimmer Estate, where around 400 residents have been told they face their properties being demolished: “People have been there less than 18 months. People thought they had their forever home and never expected to move.”