My little miracle

Mitchell Mason, nine. Sheffield, at Weston Park, Sheffield. He suffered serious injuries in a road accident two months previous and is learning to walk and talk again. Pictured with Mum, Leasa Ward
Mitchell Mason, nine. Sheffield, at Weston Park, Sheffield. He suffered serious injuries in a road accident two months previous and is learning to walk and talk again. Pictured with Mum, Leasa Ward
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IT’S little short of a miracle. Just over two months ago nine-year-old Mitchell Mason suffered devastating injuries when he was knocked down by a car on the Manor in Sheffield.

He was rushed to intensive care and underwent life-saving surgery.

Doctors had to remove part of Mitchell’s skull to allow his brain to swell - and for weeks he was in a terrible state and couldn’t even respond to his loved ones.

But all of a sudden, a few weeks ago, Mitchell spoke for the first time.

Since then he has amazed medics and his family with the pace of his recovery - and has started learning to walk again. Mum Leasa Ward is overjoyed.

“He is doing really, really well,” she told The Star.

“He has come on all of a sudden and is doing amazing things - he has surprised everybody.”

Mitchell, a pupil at Woodthorpe Primary School, must go back into the operating theatre to have a metal plate fitted in his skull this week - but Leasa remains optimistic.

“The doctors can’t tell us exactly what the rate of recovery will be, because with head injuries it is different for everyone.

“It could take a long time, but they now expect him to make a good recovery.”

Mitchell was knocked down when he ran into the path of a car near his home at the junction of Harborough Avenue and Fretson Road, on June 13. The area is an accident black spot where five roads meet beside a popular park.

A large community campaign has forced the council to act - and highways officers are looking into ways to improve road safety at the spot.

Since the accident Leasa has been living full-time at Sheffield Children’s Hospital, thanks to accommodation provided by the Treetop House charity.

“They have been amazing,” Leasa said. “There’s beds, showers, a kitchen, where parents with poorly kids can stay so they can be on the ward in minutes.

“It has been difficult. My other boys, who are 13 and 18, have been staying with their grandparents and I haven’t been able to work - before this I worked as a cook at a nursery.

“Mitchell will need 24-hour care for a long time, so I will have to give that up.”

Paying tribute to the staff at the hospital Leasa said: “All the staff have been really good.

“The doctors have been really amazing. I can’t believe what they can do.”