‘Munich drama left me in tears’

One of the players who died was David Pegg of Doncaster... Picture shows David's sister Irene Beevers of Scawsby, Doncaster with picture of him and a 1957 European Youth captain's trophy.
One of the players who died was David Pegg of Doncaster... Picture shows David's sister Irene Beevers of Scawsby, Doncaster with picture of him and a 1957 European Youth captain's trophy.
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THE sister of South Yorkshire Munich air crash victim David Pegg today said the TV drama of the tragedy brought back painful memories – and wished it had not been made.

Doncaster pensioner Irene Beevers said she was moved to tears by the drama which recreated the crash which claimed her brother’s life.

Mrs Beevers, of Scawsby, has now seen the United programme twice.

It was first screened at a special preview for families of those killed when the Manchester United team’s plane crashed at Munich Airport in 1958 and she watched it again on BBC2 on Sunday.

But she has praised Brogan West, the actor who played her older brother, for getting his mannerisims ‘just right’.

The drama focused on how Bobby Charlton handled the aftermath of the tragedy which killed eight of his team-mates, the legendary Busby Babes, and how coach Jimmy Murphy built a new team in a few days after the board had considered closing the club.

David, a left winger brought up in Highfields, Doncaster, died when the plane crashed on take-off as the club rushed to get back to England from a European Cup tie.

Mrs Beevers, now aged 70, was 18 when the family heard the shocking news.

She was one of the relatives invited to a private screening of United a few weeks ago and was impressed by how her brother was depicted.

Peggy, as he was nicknamed by the other players, was one of Charlton’s best friends in the team and shared digs with him in Manchester.

“I think the actor who played David depicted him all right. He came over as somebody who had studied the role and picked up several of his mannerisms. David had a way of flicking his hair back and the actor got that just right.”

Mrs Beevers said: “I was in tears because it obviously brought back a lot of bad memories for me and I would rather it not have been made because it was so upsetting.

“But I wasn’t offended by it and when I saw it the second time I saw more of it.

“I think the best thing about it was how it showed the players in those days were well-mannered, respectful and always looked smart.

“I clearly remember Matt Busby picking David up from our house one day when he wasn’t wearing a tie and Mr Busby said to him ‘it’s never too early to wear a tie’.

“My grandsons have no concept what it was like being a footballer in those days and I’m sure a lot of younger football fans will have a better idea after watching the programme.”