Martin Smith: England reaping historic whirlwind

England's Ben Stokes (left) exchanges words with Australia's Mitchell Johnson (right) during day four of the Second Test Match at the Adelaide Oval, Adelaide, Australia.
England's Ben Stokes (left) exchanges words with Australia's Mitchell Johnson (right) during day four of the Second Test Match at the Adelaide Oval, Adelaide, Australia.
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It’s not really a surprise to anyone is it? Australia flying at us full of rage and inspiration and tearing into England’s batsmen and bowlers with all the charm of a playground bully, writes Martin Smith.

They deserve their 2-0 lead and England have been poor in certain areas - batting, bowling and fielding come to mind.

But the aggression and confrontation are all getting a bit out of hand.

And it‘s England’s fault, to a point.

All last summer we had past players, captains and pundits lining up to say with much glee that we were going to whitewash the Aussies.

In the end it was 3-0 but England were lucky in that three of the five tests could have gone to the Aussie side that we were taking great pride in looking down upon.

We thought we were being realistic. They thought we were lording it over them.

If there’s one thing certain to bring out the ocker in the Aussie it’s the poms being superior.

Two-hundred years of our ruling class treating their country as an uncouth colonial outpost is going to stick in the cultural throat for a while - mind you our leaders felt pretty much the same way about Yorkshire.

We don’t see things from their perspective, enlightened though many of us believe ourselves to be.

The colonial chip is a heavy one to bear.

Look at the way Australians perceive the English. Whingeing poms or pompous, presumptious toffs deserving their overdue come-uppance from an honest, straight-talking Aussie.

It’s not just Australia either. The USA, mightiest nation on earth, still holds a cultural grudge against the so-called motherland that shows up in the most unexpected of places.

Look at practically all the villains in Disney movies from Captain hook to Cruella de Ville, Shere Khan in Jungle Book to Jafar in Aladdin - all sneaky, double-crossing and cowardly British toffs.

On the eve of this series people like Ian Botham played the caricatured Brit by predicting 5-0 for England, stoking up the whirlwind.

Darren Lehmann took all this and the Stuart Broad ‘not walking’ issue of last summer and turned it into a patriotic war.

As usual we didn’t see it coming, didn’t comprehend the depth of the Aussie hurt. We do now.