Man left severely disabled after botched birth at Jessop Hospital for Women in Sheffield gets record NHS compensation

The Jessop Hospital for Women was closed in 2001 and replaced by Jessop Maternity Wing as part of the Royal Hallamshire Hospital
The Jessop Hospital for Women was closed in 2001 and replaced by Jessop Maternity Wing as part of the Royal Hallamshire Hospital
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A man left catastrophically disabled by negligence during his birth at the Jessop Hospital for Women has won record compensation from the NHS.

If, as expected, he lives into his 70s, the award will be worth more than £20 million, even before inflation.

Now in his 20s, he is confined to a wheelchair and needs 24-hour care.

NHS lawyers accepted that his premature delivery was negligently handled.

Although he was premature and in the wrong position in the womb, medics failed to take the option of a Caesarean delivery, the judge said.

As well as being unable to walk, he can make only limited use of his hands and his intellect is also impaired.

He can speak well enough to make himself understood,and feed himself, but is 'wholly dependent on others for most aspects of daily living'.

Mr Justice William Davis said: “He is described by all who have had dealings with him as a delightful young man with an outgoing personality and many interests.

“For someone with the physical and other difficulties he faces, he leads an extraordinarily active life.”

The man, who cannot be identified, was awarded a lump sum of almost £8m to pay for a lifetime’s care.

The award against Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust includes £300,000 for 'pain, suffering and loss of amenity'.

His loss of earnings award came to almost £1.2m and travel, transport and equipment costs were over £2.6m.

The total lump sum award came to £7,928,140. The annual payments were fixed at £293,117 – they will rise with inflation throughout his life.

The care package will include paying for 24-hour care, including two “waking night carers” to help cope with his painful nocturnal spasms.

Nobody from the hospital, which closed in 2001 and was replaced by a maternity unit in the Jessop Wing of the Royal Hallamshire Hospital, has so far commented.