DCSIMG

MPs in call to safeguard pit

Labour candidates Rosie Winterton, Ed Miliband and Caroline Flint, pictured celebrating winning the three Doncaster seats in the general election. Picture: Marie Caley D0821MC

Labour candidates Rosie Winterton, Ed Miliband and Caroline Flint, pictured celebrating winning the three Doncaster seats in the general election. Picture: Marie Caley D0821MC

DONCASTER’S MPs have demanded action to secure the future of Hatfield Colliery - after the Government’s decision to drop a green power plant plan for the site.

Ed Miliband, Caroline Flint and Rosie Winterton have held an urgent meeting with Secretary of State for Energy Ed Davey to seek answers about why the project by 2Co Energy to build a carbon capture plant was dropped.

Doncaster North MP Mr Miliband said: “We demanded the meeting because carbon capture and storage is a major energy technology of the future, in this case next to one of the few remaining productive collieries in South Yorkshire.

“The Government appears determined that the Don Valley Power Project will not get its support – so it is essential that they offer a strategy for Hatfield to help to secure jobs and encourage new businesses to locate at the site.

“I’m determined that Hatfield can have a future and remain hopeful that CCS can still bring benefits to South Yorkshire. This issue is about jobs and growth.”

The plan was left off a list of projects for £1 billion of Government cash earlier this year.

Don Valley MP Caroline Flint said: “When the Government announced the shortlist, they said ‘the decision was made on deliverability, affordability, and value for the taxpayer’.

“We hotly disputed the suggestion that the Doncaster project was less deliverable than other projects.

“The evidence suggests that it was ahead in preparing detailed designs.”

Doncaster Central MP Rosie Winterton added: “We believe Britain can be a world leader in carbon capture and storage and here was a project that would remove up to five million tonnes of Co2 per year and invest £5 billion in the UK’s energy infrastructure.

“The project had reached an advanced stage of design and would be up and running within five years. We do not want to see this expertise or technology cast aside by the government.”

The MPs told Mr Davey that the scheme was ranked number one by the EU in its assessment of CCS projects, which involve removing carbon dioxide and pumping it into disused oil wells under the North Sea.

Earlier this year, Lewis Gillies, chief executive of 2Co Energy, described his firm’s omission as ‘truly disappointing news’.

 

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