DCSIMG

Hillsborough jury told of ‘painstaking work’ to identify victims

Detective Superintendent Neil Malkin who is leading Operation Resolve - the criminal investigation into the Hillsborough disaster.

Detective Superintendent Neil Malkin who is leading Operation Resolve - the criminal investigation into the Hillsborough disaster.

 

Jurors at the new inquests into the Hillsborough tragedy heard today about the ‘painstaking’ work carried out by investigators to identify the victims through thousands of videos and photographs.

The new proceedings in Warrington resumed this morning with evidence from Detective Superintendent Neil Malkin, senior investigation manager for Operation Resolve, the criminal investigation into the disaster.

His team is looking at events on the day and the planning and preparation in the run up to the fateful FA Cup semi final in April 1989.

Det Supt Malkin told the jury 191 officers working for Operation Resolve had trawled through 2,000 videos and 7,000 photos - some of which were provided by The Star - to identify the 96 victims.

He also said his team had looked at 500,000 documents and interviewed 1,500 people, including the Hillsborough families, which he said had been ‘extremely beneficial’ for the investigative process.

Det Supt Malkin said there were 83 turnstiles in operation at Hillsborough on the day of the match between Liverpool FC and Nottingham Forest.

Of those, 23 were allocated to Liverpool fans and 60 to Forest supporters.

Det Supt Malkin explained the layout of the ground and who was responsible for safety on the day.

He also explained the responsibilities of Sheffield Wednesday FC and Sheffield Council.

He told the jury the police policy was to segregate the fans and described the different routes taken by the fans after they got inside the ground.

The jury was also shown images of the Leppings Lane stand, where the disaster happened, including photographs of the pens, the tunnel that led to them, the perimeter fences with wire on the top and the police control box which overlooked the stand.

The court was also shown images of views from inside the police box and a picture of Gate C, which was normally closed on match days, partly open with a police officer standing next to it.

The jury will visit the stadium later this week.

 
 
 

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