DCSIMG

Author solves riddle of Sheffield WWII plane crash

A memorial wreath laying service in Endcliffe Park for the 70th anniversary for the crew of the Mi-Amigo

A memorial wreath laying service in Endcliffe Park for the 70th anniversary for the crew of the Mi-Amigo

A military historian believes he’s solved one of the longest-standing Second World War mysteries during research into a bomber plane that crashed into a Sheffield park in 1944.

Paul Allonby has been researching the events of the day the B-17 ‘Mi-Amigo’ Flying Fortress crash-landed in Endcliffe Park, killing its crew of 10.

He has unearthed documents which he believes identify the German fighter pilot responsible for doing the damage that caused the plane to crash. He plans to put his findings into a book once research is complete.

Mr Allonby said: “Previously we have known the broad facts of that day, but following extensive research under the US Freedom of Information Act, and through archives in Germany and Denmark, I have been able to gather much more information.”

The aircrew, led by pilot Lieutenant John Kriegshauser, were on their 15th mission of a 25-raid tour of duty when they were tasked to attack a German-held airfield in Denmark.

Documents reveal a young German fighter pilot, Unteroffizer Erich Naujokat, flying his first interception mission, attacked the B-17.

The ‘Mi-Amigo’, badly damaged, began its return home - while Naujokat’s aircraft plunged into the sea and his body was washed-up on the Swedish coastline.

Mi-Amigo’s pilot Lt Kriegshauser was awarded a posthumous Distinguished Flying Cross for avoiding children playing football in the park, the research states.

“There is an enduring interest in what happened that day, and I feel humbled to have shed fresh light on events,” added Mr Allonby, of Old Whittington, near Chesterfield.

 

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