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LETTERS: Don’t be put off carrying your baby

WEB TILE Letters

WEB TILE Letters

I am prompted to write after reading a letter printed on Saturday entitled ‘Don’t risk your baby for a pretty sling’.

I am prompted to write after reading a letter printed on Saturday entitled ‘Don’t risk your baby for a pretty sling’.

I am saddened by how you can print a letter which includes such unlikely events.

I do not live in Sheffield but had been visiting friends from the group Sheffield Slings when I read it.

It is clear from this writer’s response that they know very little about the art of carrying your baby.

Using a pushchair is not risk free. I have first hand experience of that.

A sling is practical and has numerous benefits for both mother and child, including reducing reflux symptoms, developing breast feeding relationship and reducing risk of postnatal depression.

If you fall you instinctively put your hands out to stop you and most likely injure yourself to protect baby. If you slip pushing a buggy baby could roll into the road.

I am a qualified babywearing consultant and teach many parents each month how to safely and comfortably carry their babies. When discussing safety I provide parents with details of the TICKS guidelines for safe babywearing. (Tight, inview, close enough to kiss, keep chin off chest and supported back) and warn them not to ride bikes or horses.

I do not tell parents not to go for a stroll. It is one of the main benefits of using a sling.

It means you can be hands free and go places buggies won’t let you go.

The pram is a relatively modern invention developed in Victorian England. Babies have a biological and physiological need to be carried.

As for slings being pretty, it is an added benefit. I am sure the reader chooses clothes which are pretty and when using a sling for as much time as we do why shouldn’t we choose something that looks nice to wear too.

If you want to carry your baby do not let naysayers and scaremongers stop you, but seek the advice of a babywearing consultant, a sling library or experienced sling users.

Rachel Coy, The North East Sling Library, Durham

 

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