Jewellery that carries a very serious message

Rachel Salway has designed, commissioned and now sells an entire collection of bracelets that raise funds for various anti-trafficking charities
Rachel Salway has designed, commissioned and now sells an entire collection of bracelets that raise funds for various anti-trafficking charities
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Jewellery designer Rachel Salway is a woman on a mission – to combat human trafficking.

The Sheffield entrepreneur is urging people to back her fundraising initiative.

Rachel Salway

Rachel Salway

A trip to India and Africa in 2007 set the 40-year-old on a mission to prevent exploitation of vulnerable adults and children around the world.

“I saw the level of poverty firsthand and felt a need to raise awareness of trade ethics and to empower workers,” said Rachel, of Westfield. “I wanted to give them a better life using my business knowledge in management.”

Rachel set up a fair trade fashion website called Roseannah selling clothing, accessories and jewellery and began to partner a variety of organisations, including a number of anti-trafficking charities.

She said: “I was traumatised by the stories of lives affected by human trafficking – people think it only happens in places like Cambodia and Thailand, but it’s closer than you think.

“I remember one particularly upsetting story of a lady who was trafficked into the UK from Uganda who didn’t see the light of day for more than six years. It happened here in Sheffield, not the other side of the world.

“I decided I needed to invest further time and money to help support victims of the horrendous crime and to raise awareness that elements of slavery are still present today.”

Rachel designed, commissioned and now sells an entire collection of bracelets that raise funds for anti-trafficking charities supporting victims in Sheffield and overseas.

The bracelets are available in a silver or gold colour and feature coloured glass beads to reflect the charity they support.

“Some of the jewellery is made by survivors of trafficking overseas and others are made here in the UK so every piece has a little story behind it,” said Rachel. 
“I wanted them to be trendy and fashionable and to provide a talking point to help spread awareness.”

Rachel’s latest collection is in aid of Destiny Rescue, an international charity which rescues children from human trafficking and sexual exploitation.

She hopes to raise £935 through the sales of her bracelets and jewellery parties by Christmas – enough for the charity to send undercover rescue agents to help children escape from traffickers’ clutches.

“In the grand scheme of things that’s not much money to rescue a child from an horrendous situation and give them a new life,” said Rachel.

To buy a charity bracelet or book a jewellery party, visit www.roseannah.com