Hundreds turn out for Black Lives Matter peace rally in Sheffield

Black Lives Matter demonstration on Devonshire Green in Sheffield

Black Lives Matter demonstration on Devonshire Green in Sheffield

Hundreds of people marched peacefully through Sheffield as part of the rapidly spreading Black Lives Matter movement.

The Sheffield Black Lives Matter march mirrored peaceful protest seen in other cities like Leeds and Manchester, Bristol and Cardiff, Birmingham and London over the past few weeks.

The movement organisers said to wanted to show solidarity with movements across the USA after two high profile killings of black citizens by police officers.

Campaigners also came out to remember those who lost their lives in police custody in the UK and denounced racism and xenophobia in all levels of society.

At the time of the march, over 1,300 people said they were interested in attending the event which ran alongside the first night of the Tramlines music festival weekend.

The peaceful march started in Devonshire Green before making its way up Pinstone Street to Barker’s Pool.

Black Lives Matter demonstration on Devonshire Green in Sheffield

Black Lives Matter demonstration on Devonshire Green in Sheffield

A rally then followed with speeches and performances from campaigners and musicians.

Speakers included organiser, student Ross Walcott and Sheffield City councillor Magid Mah.

Fir Vale student Katura Burrows-Robotham, aged 19, said she was horrified by the events in the USA and wanted come out to show solidarity.

She said: “I’m really passionate about the Black Lives Matter movement, it’s very important to me,

Black Lives Matter demonstration on Devonshire Green in Sheffield

Black Lives Matter demonstration on Devonshire Green in Sheffield

“It’s very encouraging to see lots of young people from different races and religions.

“It’s not just about police shooting people in the USA but standing up to racism and discrimination here as well.”

Dave Campbell, 57, was born in Burngreave but now lives in Dore. He said: “I’d say to people look at your own work place and see if Sheffield is truly represented there, are black people represented? If not, why not? We’re the fourth largest city in England.”

Josue Nem, 47, of Richmond said: “We’re lucky we don’t live in USA and our police don’t carry guns but we still suffer other forms of discrimination. It’s about fighting injustice and saying we are all one people.”

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