Three of a kind as city triplets celebrate their 75th birthday

Triplets Margaret, Muriel and Mary Beal celebrating their 75th anniversary at Margaret and Mary's home in Wisewood, Sheffield
Triplets Margaret, Muriel and Mary Beal celebrating their 75th anniversary at Margaret and Mary's home in Wisewood, Sheffield
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THERE were three times as many reasons to celebrate when triplets - believed to be the first born in Sheffield - came together to mark their 75th birthday.

Margaret and Mary Beal, of Wisewood, celebrated with sister Muriel Chippersild who returned to the city from Norfolk, where she moved when she married husband Roger.

They got together at the home Margaret and Mary share and celebrated with a meal at The Peacock pub in Stannington.

The trio believe they were the first triplets to be born at Sheffield’s former City General hospital. They were the third, fourth and fifth child for parents Eva and Leonard.

The girls were younger sisters to brothers Ernest and Eric. The Beals went on to have another - a girl called Eva.

Their birth was such a significant event that their mother received a letter from the King - along with a cheque for £3 from the King’s Bounty.

Youngest triplet Muriel met her husband in Great Yarmouth and the couple have been married for 52 years. They have four children and three grandchildren. Eldest triplet Margaret and Mary remain inseparable - having stayed together living with their parents in Hillsborough, before moving to Wisewood 30 years ago. They even went to work together at Simpkins sweet factory, where they were employed for 45 years.

Margaret said: “We used to have some fun when we worked there. It was particularly good when new people started, because they used to get really confused - they’d walk past one of us one minute and then the other the next. They couldn’t work out what was going on! We certainly played a few tricks during our years there.”

The pair, who have 16 nieces and nephews, said it was great to have Muriel back in Sheffield so they could celebrate.