Table of horrors on show in advice to beat food poisoning

Caption: Peter Davies and Health Education Supervisor Judith Appleton in the 'calamity kitchen'.

Caption: Peter Davies and Health Education Supervisor Judith Appleton in the 'calamity kitchen'.

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EXPERTS are trying to take action to cut back on food poisoning cases in Doncaster after more than 600 cases were recorded last year.

Doncaster Council’s food team have been running a series of events to mark Food Safety Week to deal with the problem, including a table set up to highlight possible causes of food-related sickness.

Mayor of Doncaster Peter Davies joined staff at the Bentley Training Kitchen to try to draw attention to the issue.

Food Safety Week is a national initiative held annually by the Food Standards Agency to promote good food hygiene in the home.

This year it has been running this week, and continues until tomorrow.

The theme behind the week this year is behind closed doors - what do people really do in their kitchens?

The kitchen at the training centre was set up as what organisers described as the ‘calamity kitchen.’

It was used to teach members of the public about food safety.

And members of the public flocked to the venue to take part in drop-in sessions.

Staff at the centre showed the visitors about food safety, healthier eating, physical exercise and growing your own fruit and vegetables.

The events have been run by staff from the council, the NHS and local businesses.

Mr Davies said: “Last year our Food Team recorded over 600 cases of food poisoning in Doncaster.

“Food safety week is all about raising awareness of potential dangers in the kitchen and how to avoid them.”

Among the hazards highlighted in the kitchen set up in the centre on High Street, Bentley, were a pet cat sitting on the working surface used for cooking on.

There were also examples of dirty catering equipment, and different foods being prepared on surfaces which could cause potential cross- contamination, which can lead to serious food poisoning.

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