Sheffield woman wins payout after medical blunder puts her in intensive care

Lisa Moate who won an out of court settlement from Sheffields Northern General hospital following her treatment there in 2010
Lisa Moate who won an out of court settlement from Sheffields Northern General hospital following her treatment there in 2010
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A woman who spent a week in intensive care after a medical blunder after a routine operation has received an out-of-court compensation payment.

Lisa Moate has received the settlement from Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust after it admitted failures in the way she was given intravenous drugs at the Northern General Hospital in September 2010.

Lisa Moate and husband Ricky who won an out of court settlement from Sheffields Northern General hospital following her treatment there in 2010

Lisa Moate and husband Ricky who won an out of court settlement from Sheffields Northern General hospital following her treatment there in 2010

The 33-year-old, from Wincobank, developed a severe infection following an operation for a problem with her bowel because the correct technique was not used by medical staff every time they used a central line in her neck to give intravenous drugs – and spent a week on a life support machine.

Since being released from hospital Lisa has developed post traumatic stress disorder.

Husband Ricky, 31, believes the case highlights what happens when medical staff are under pressure.

He said: “This isn’t a personal attack on the nurses and we aren’t blaming any individual for what happened.

“We feel it shows the way the health care system is failing. The nursing staff are that rushed because of cutbacks and are short staffed that they haven’t got the appropriate time to spend on each patients and do things correctly.

“If they put more money into having more staff and more training they would make less mistakes and have less negligence payouts.”

Ricky added: “It has never been about the money, it has been about the principle.

“If they had done their job properly in the first place then we wouldn’t have had a legal case against them.

“It’s effected us all. Lisa has said that she isn’t the same person as she was before.”

Dr David Throssell, medical director at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, apologised the correct technique had not been used, blaming human error.

He said: “Our staff work exceptionally hard to provide high quality, safe care for all our patients and so we are very sorry that the correct technique was not used every time Mrs Moate was given intravenous drugs in September 2010.

“We can only imagine how upsetting this must have been for her and her family and a full review of Mrs Moate’s care has been undertaken.

“The incident was a genuine human error by an experienced member or members of staff.

“However, as a result of the review, a number of measures have been put in place to limit the chances of this happening again. This includes additional yearly training to all nurses.

“The surgical unit where Mrs Moate was treated is a busy unit, however, the review did not highlight that there were any staff shortages at the time of the incident.”