Sheffield teenager riding high after beating illness

Teenager Emma Adams, of Park Hill, who has overcome the painful spinal condition scoliosis to continue her favourite pastime of horseriding
Teenager Emma Adams, of Park Hill, who has overcome the painful spinal condition scoliosis to continue her favourite pastime of horseriding
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A teenager from Sheffield is enjoying her passion for horses again after overcoming a painful spinal condition.

Emma Adams’ dream of working with her favourite animals looked to be shattered when she was diagnosed with scoliosis, an abnormal curving of the spine.

The 17-year-old was lacking in energy, suffered aches and pains and struggled to sit up properly as her posture became steadily poorer.

Emma, of Manor Oaks Drive, Park Hill, faced a 10-hour spinal fusion operation to correct her symptoms - but has now avoided the need for surgery by taking an exercise course.

She said: “My back looks amazing and I have my energy back.

“My confidence has soared and I’m so excited about getting back to riding.”

Emma was diagnosed with scoliosis at the age of 14 by her family’s GP, after her mum noticed one of her shoulder blades was protruding on one side.

An orthopaedic specialist said the curve in her back was one of the worst they had seen, and Emma’s only option was surgery to fuse her spine from top to bottom.

She said: “Scoliosis destroyed my world. When I started feeling tired and getting pain down my back, it was hard to stay motivated.”

Emma was given a treatment called ScolioGold, offered at a London clinic.

The remedy involves exercises designed for each patient, examining posture and using osteopathy and ‘trigger point’ muscular therapy.

Emma said: “I am ecstatic I have been able to avoid surgery.”

Scoliosis affects more than 4 per cent of the UK population, and can lead to serious heart and lung problems if left untreated.