Scientists’ city visit

European scientists have teamed up with clinicians from Sheffield to develop new treatments for people with bladder problems.From left Prof Christopher Chapple with Sab�niano Roman, Martin Slovak and Michelle Battye 'TRUST' project manager
European scientists have teamed up with clinicians from Sheffield to develop new treatments for people with bladder problems.From left Prof Christopher Chapple with Sab�niano Roman, Martin Slovak and Michelle Battye 'TRUST' project manager
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Two young European scientists have joined Sheffield clinicians to develop treatments for people with bladder problems.

Martin Slovak, from the Czech Republic, and Sabìniano Roman, from Spain, are taking part in a multi-million-pound EU-funded project, looking to find ways of treating conditions such as overactive bladder syndrome.

Martin, aged 27, a biomedical engineer graduate, is leading studies into whether electrical pulses can help control symptoms and reduce the need to use the toilet frequently.

Meanwhile, fellow 27-year-old Sabìniano, who studied biology, is testing to see if a new biodegradable synthetic mesh could be used to help women needing surgical treatments for pelvic organ prolapse.

The project – called Training Urology Scientists to Develop Treatments – is being led by Prof Chris Chapple, consultant urological surgeon at Sheffield’s Royal Hallamshire Hospital.

Martin and Sabìniano are in Sheffield as part of a three-year contract.

Michelle Battye, EU project manager, said: “This is really exciting research, which is already showing promising results that could potentially lead to the development of new treatments.

“The young researchers involved in our project benefit firsthand from the skills and knowledge of some of the top consultants in the field working in Europe.”

An estimated 14 million men and women of all ages in the UK have bladder problems.