Pupils learn how to be life-savers at Sheffield university

All Saints Catholic High School pupils, Megan Armitage, aged 15, Katelan Greetham, aged 14, Megan Torpey, also aged 14, and Tadiwa Mapiningg, aged 15, watched by senior lecturer in adult nursing Mandy Brailsford, practice life saving techniques at Sheffield Hallam Univesity's Robert Winston Building in Broomhall.
All Saints Catholic High School pupils, Megan Armitage, aged 15, Katelan Greetham, aged 14, Megan Torpey, also aged 14, and Tadiwa Mapiningg, aged 15, watched by senior lecturer in adult nursing Mandy Brailsford, practice life saving techniques at Sheffield Hallam Univesity's Robert Winston Building in Broomhall.
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School pupils from across the region learned vital life-saving lessons during a special session in Sheffield.

More than 40 pupils aged 14 to 16 from secondary schools in South Yorkshire were shown how to give CPR.

The event at Sheffield Hallam University was hosted by staff and students from the Faculty of Health and Wellbeing, in association with the UK Resuscitation Council and the British Heart Foundation.

The young people were also joined by high school teacher Matthew Burton, one of the stars of the hit Channel Four TV series Educating Yorkshire.

Organiser Mandy Brailsford, senior lecturer in adult nursing at the university, said: “Only one in 10 people survive a witnessed, out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the UK.

“In Norway and Seattle, where CPR is a mandatory component of the school curriculum, survival rates are more than 50 per cent which is a phenomenal amount compared to this country.

“Both staff and students from the faculty feel extremely strongly about encouraging early learning of CPR and that is why we have all dedicated our spare time to host this event so more lives can be saved in the future.”

Mr Burton, assistant head of Thornhill Community Academy in Dewsbury, West Yorkshire, took a tour of the health faculty with the teenagers, before the whole group tried their new-found skills using the nurse training facilities.

The British Heart Foundation recently launched a campaign to have life-saving techniques as a compulsory part of the school curriculum.

The campaign has been supported by retired premiership footballer Fabrice Muamba, who collapsed during an FA cup tie in September 2012 but made a remarkable recovery after he was given CPR for 78 minutes.

“I remember there was a lot of shock and despair at the time of Fabrice’s collapse,” said Mr Burton.

“He was young, athletic and as a footballer one of the fittest among our society, and it’s these kinds of incidents that prove an emergency can happen at any time, anywhere.

“It’s quite surprising that in just the short session I’ve taken part in at Hallam, I am now equipped to be able to help save a life – and it’s something we should all be doing, adults included!”