Parents overcome their fears to help children’s hospital in Sheffield

A group of thankful mums and dads have overcome their fears of arctic water, blazing fire and towering heights, as they got muddy for the hospital that has helped to make all of their children better.
A group of thankful mums and dads have overcome their fears of arctic water, blazing fire and towering heights, as they got muddy for the hospital that has helped to make all of their children better.
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Plucky parents overcame their fears of freezing water, blazing fire and towering heights as they got muddy for the hospital that helped their children.

The Karate Mudders – whose children attend Makenki Shukokai karate classes at Stocksbridge Community Leisure Centre – raised money for The Children’s Hospital Charity at Tough Mudder: North West.

A group of thankful mums and dads have overcome their fears of arctic water, blazing fire and towering heights, as they got muddy for the hospital that has helped to make all of their children better.

A group of thankful mums and dads have overcome their fears of arctic water, blazing fire and towering heights, as they got muddy for the hospital that has helped to make all of their children better.

They battled through underwater tunnels, tear gas, electric rods and over vertical walls to make it to the finish line and raise hundreds of pounds.

Marc Gosling, a senior housing officer for Sheffield Council, joined the group to give back to the hospital for the care his son, Willis, is receiving for symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease.

He said the care the two-year-old has received from hospital staff has been second to none.

Marc said: “The nurses make Willis feel so comfortable. If he tells them ‘it hurts’ then they’ll have a good look and make sure everything’s okay.

“They don’t think that because he’s a two-year-old he doesn’t understand, they listen to him and care about how he feels.”

Marc and wife Emma discovered Willis was producing blood filled stool and took him to Sheffield Children’s Hospital in April.

The tot has spent the past six months undergoing tests to treat problems with his bowel and immune system, and is given six different tablets every day to manage the symptoms of his condition, which is yet to be diagnosed.

Marc added: “It’s hard for him. I look at him and he’s so small and it’s not fair but he does have great care and it makes it so much easier for our family.

“When I was face down in the mud at Tough Mudder, a fear I really had to overcome, I just had to think of why I was doing it and how thankful I am for the hospital.”

Personal trainer Rachel Howard also took part after her children Patrick, 11, and Megan, eight, received treatment for minor injuries.

She said: “Everyone’s got their own fears, whether it’s jumping off high platforms or plunging into cold water, but it really helps you to overcome them when you’re working as a team and getting everyone through the finish line in one piece. The sense of achievement afterwards is amazing.

“We’ve all used Sheffield Children’s Hospital at some point – some of our kids are treated for ongoing problems and others have had at least one accident and have needed to use A&E to stick the kids back together.”

Patrick hit his head on a radiator when he was two, while his sister suffered a suspected broken hand after playing on a bouncy castle.

Rachel added: “When my son had split his head open, I was so panicked. He was extremely upset and crying uncontrollably because there was so much blood, but the staff in the hospital knew exactly what to do to calm him down and, in turn, it made me relax and know he was in good hands.”

The group raised almost £2,000, which will help to ensure Sheffield Children’s Hospital remains at the forefront of paediatric care.