Grandad had 31 brain tumours treated in Sheffield

Clive Stone poses in the Quadrangle of Buckingham Palace, London after being presented with a member of the British Empire (MBE) medal by The Prince of Wales. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Wednesday May 11 2011. See PA story ROYAL Investiture. Photo credit should read: Anthony Devlin/PA Wire
Clive Stone poses in the Quadrangle of Buckingham Palace, London after being presented with a member of the British Empire (MBE) medal by The Prince of Wales. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Wednesday May 11 2011. See PA story ROYAL Investiture. Photo credit should read: Anthony Devlin/PA Wire
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An inspirational cancer campaigner who had 31 brain tumours treated in Sheffield has praised the city’s facilities.

Grandad Clive Stone underwent several bouts of stereotactic radiosurgery - also known as Gamma Knife - at the city’s Royal Hallamshire and Thornbury hospitals after his kidney cancer spread to his brain.

The 67-year-old said he would have died without the treatment, which uses focused beams of gamma radiation to treat lesions with 0.1mm of precision.

Today he thanked staff who saved his life - as new figures shows Sheffield is the best place in the country for treating people with advanced radiotherapy.

Clive, who persuaded Prime Minister David Cameron to give £200m for a cancer drug fund, and was given a British Empire Medal for his campaigning, said: “I had brain surgery on three tumours in Oxford but the surgeon said there was one he couldn’t get - if he went for it, he would have killed me.

“But he had trained at Sheffield and knew they had a gamma knife, so I was treated there on five occasions for 31 of my 32 tumours.

“I must be the most treated person with regard to brain tumours.

“Basically they got the lot, and my latest scan showed there was no sign of cancer in my brain.

“I’d have been dead by now without the treatment - I cannot thank them enough.”

Figures revealed in a Parliamentary question show 1,000 patients a year are treated on Sheffield’s three gamma knife machines, when 500 are treated across the rest of the country. The city is home to the National Centre for Stereotactic Radiosurgery, based at the Hallamshire.

Patients - who come from across the UK and Europe - can be treated as a day case. Mr Stone, of Oxford, now wants there to be more machines in the UK.

However a report leaked from NHS England said a ‘concentration of existing provision is required’.

Thornbury neurosurgery chief Andras Kemeny, who carried out Clive’s treatment, will speak at a charity ball for the Brains Trust at the Cutler’s Hall tomorrow.

Tickets, priced £75, are available. Email nicola.crisp@bmihealthcare.co.uk