Coasting it to raise hospice cash

Professor Pamela Shaw  with Gerald Brooks (left) and Jeremy Martin (right).
Professor Pamela Shaw with Gerald Brooks (left) and Jeremy Martin (right).
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STAFF from a Sheffield bank completed a coast to coast ride to raise thousands of pounds for a hospice charity.

STAFF from a Sheffield bank completed a coast to coast ride to raise thousands of pounds for a hospice charity.

The five workers from Yorkshire Bank’s Financial Solutions Centre battled torrential rain, punctures and 2,000ft climbs as they cycled 138 miles from Whitehaven to Tynemouth in just three days.

With a contribution from their employer, the group hope to have raised more than £5,500 for the Help for Hospices charity which supports hospices across the country, including St Luke’s in Sheffield. Team member Terry Stanley, a junior partner at the centre and one of those who took part, said: “The idea came from a conversation on a staff night out.

“We wanted to do something for Help the Hospices, which is the chosen charity of Clydesdale and Yorkshire Bank, but needed a proper challenge to give people the incentive to donate.

“The coast to coast was suggested and the idea grew from there.

“Little did we know how much training would be needed, let alone the logistics of getting five of us there and back with all the kit.”

The group - which also included Mark Smedley, Graham Ibbotson, Oliver Dean and Steve Tweedle - said they were thrilled to have completed the challenge and raised so much.

Terry added: “We’d like to say a huge thank you to everyone who kindly donated - it has made all the training and pain so worthwhile. We’ve been overwhelmed by the fantastic and generous donations.” Bernadette Nolan, senior corporate partnerships executive at Help the Hospices, said: “The vast majority of hospices are independent local charities, and offer their care and support free of charge to patients – but it is not free to provide.

“With the support of staff from Clydesdale and Yorkshire Banks, hospices can continue to deliver the best possible care to adults and children with life-limiting and terminal illnesses, as well as to their friends and families.”