Bright as a button Jenson in running for Star Superkids award

Superkid Jenson Brown, four, at his home in Frecheville, Sheffield, suffers from a rare illness called Edwards Syndrome. He was only expected to survive eight weeks after birth
Superkid Jenson Brown, four, at his home in Frecheville, Sheffield, suffers from a rare illness called Edwards Syndrome. He was only expected to survive eight weeks after birth
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LITTLE Jenson Brown really is a medical miracle.

When he was born doctors told his proud new parents Amy and Chris their tiny boy had Edwards’ Syndrome, an extremely rare chromosomal defect.

They said he was unlikely to survive eight weeks and, even if he did live that long, he had only a five per cent chance of making it to his first birthday.

But the little Sheffield fighter wowed his parents and his doctors to defy their predictions.

He is now four years old, and a happy, cheeky ray of sunshine who gives joy to all who meet him.

He cannot speak and he needs special equipment to walk, but he gets by with the help of his family and attends mainstream Mundella Primary School in Norton Lees.

Jenson’s grandmother Debra Burrell has nominated the little lad for The Star Superkids Triumph over Adversity Award.

For the 15th year The Star is seeking out South Yorkshire’s most special children, to celebrate their achievements, qualities and talents.

The awards will be handed out at a celebrity-packed awards ceremony in Sheffield next month - and the nominations are pouring in.

Debra said she nominated Jenson, who lives in Frecheville, because “he has well and truly overcome adversity”.

Edwards’ Syndrome is so rare only five children in the country are living with the condition.

It affects around one in 6,000 live births, but tragically many babies then die when they are very young.

“Jenson has three holes in his heart, a raised pallet, a twisted hernia, a low immune system and severe scoliosis,” Debra said. “The doctors said he would never suckle, sit up, walk or develop normally.

“Despite all that, and due to the hard work and commitment of his parents and the fabulous staff at Sheffield Children’s Hospital, Jenson can now feed himself, walk, and communicate with sign language. He has a whole load of friends and we couldn’t be more proud of how far he has come on.”

Jenson’s mum Amy, 28, said: “Jenson is a very clever little boy. He can’t speak but he makes himself understood using Makaton, a sign language for children. We are very, very proud of him.”