Grant boosts Sheffield woodland

The Veolia Environmental Trust has awarded a grant of �10,650 to the Wildlife Trust for Sheffield and Rotherham towards significant access and habitat improvements to Moss Valley woodlands. 'A new post and rail fence has also been built at Dowey Lumb  to replace an old, collapsing fence that protected it from motorbikes.
The Veolia Environmental Trust has awarded a grant of �10,650 to the Wildlife Trust for Sheffield and Rotherham towards significant access and habitat improvements to Moss Valley woodlands. 'A new post and rail fence has also been built at Dowey Lumb to replace an old, collapsing fence that protected it from motorbikes.
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Popular Sheffield woodlands are to be made easier to visit thanks to a £10,650 grant awarded by a company’s environmental trust.

The money from Veolia will pay for access and habitat improvements in the Moss Valley woodlands to the south of the city.

Work is already under way thanks to staff, apprentices and volunteers from the Wildlife Trust for Sheffield and Rotherham, as well as help from the local ramblers’ group.

The area is stunning in the spring, brimming with bluebells and other woodland flowers associated with ancient woodlands.

But access can be difficult in wet conditions and the slippery banks leading down to the streams have been of particular concern.

The team has used part of the grant, which was awarded through the Landfill Communities Fund, to build steps into the banks so they are in keeping with the wild appearance of the woods.

Work has also been carried out at Dowey Lumb, a beautiful part of the valley that over the years has become dominated by bracken and scrub.

The bracken has now been cut and some scrub has been removed to keep the grassland open and attractive to bees and butterflies.

A new post and rail fence has also been built, to replace an old collapsing fence that protected it from motorbikes.

A new fence will also be built to protect Coal Pit Wood from motorbike riders, to be decorated in the future with hedge plants, creating a new habitat for birds, insects and small animals.

Other work still to be completed includes some coppicing, improvements to a bridleway and the removal of some holly to allow tree seeds to become established.

Executive Director of The Veolia Environmental Trust Paul Taylor said: “We are pleased to be supporting this important project and it is great to hear that it is progressing well.

“The improvements will make a real difference to the visitors to the woodlands and the local wildlife. I look forward to hearing about the next stage of work.”