Flood victims remembered

Yorkshire Water's Newman Booth (l) and Ian Hope, Chair of the British Dam Society (r) with the new memorial stone

Yorkshire Water's Newman Booth (l) and Ian Hope, Chair of the British Dam Society (r) with the new memorial stone

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Victims who died in the Great Sheffield Flood 150 years ago have been commemorated with a new memorial stone.

Some 650 million gallons of water crashed out of the Dale Dyke Reservoir when its dam burst – flooding the valleys below.

The new memorial has been funded by Yorkshire Water and the British Dam Society and created by artist Andrew Vickers.

It is situated near the newer Dale Dyke dam, which was built further up the valley from the original and completed in 1875.

Newman Booth, reservoir specialist at Yorkshire Water, said: “We felt it was only right to honour the victims of this devastating flood with a new memorial stone.

“Reservoirs are such a familiar part of our landscape that it’s easy to forget they hold many millions of gallons of water and, if not properly managed and maintained, can pose a significant risk.

“That’s why we have a dedicated team of engineers looking after our 137 Yorkshire reservoirs.

“We do the worrying about safety so our customers don’t have to.

“We hope the communities of the Don Valley and the families of the 270 victims think this is an appropriate way to mark the anniversary of this devastating event.”

The shape of the memorial stone mirrors the breach of the original dam.

Its positioning allows visitors to look through the notch to the Loxley Valley below and see the route the water would have taken on that fateful night.

Dale Dyke was one of a series of reservoirs built in the 1850s and 60s in the Bradfield area in response to the growing population.

When the dam burst – as the reservoir was being filled for the first time – the effects reached as far afield as Doncaster and Rotherham.

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