First-aid lifesavers honoured by runner

A seasoned Sheffield born marathon runner who was helped by St John Ambulance volunteers after she collapsed during the 2012 London marathon, has chosen to run for the first aid charity in this year's Great North Run.  The iconic half marathon, which attracts more than 55,000 runners, takes place in Newcastle upon Tyne on 7 September. ''Caroline Linares, 35, a property manager originally from High Green, North Sheffield who now lives in Wimbledon was treated by first aiders for dehydration and heat exhaustion and will run and raise funds for St John Ambulance to thank the volunteers for possibly saving her life.
A seasoned Sheffield born marathon runner who was helped by St John Ambulance volunteers after she collapsed during the 2012 London marathon, has chosen to run for the first aid charity in this year's Great North Run. The iconic half marathon, which attracts more than 55,000 runners, takes place in Newcastle upon Tyne on 7 September. ''Caroline Linares, 35, a property manager originally from High Green, North Sheffield who now lives in Wimbledon was treated by first aiders for dehydration and heat exhaustion and will run and raise funds for St John Ambulance to thank the volunteers for possibly saving her life.
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A Sheffield runner who collapsed during a marathon has entered another race to raise cash for the charity which helped her.

Caroline Linares, from High Green, fell unconscious during the 2012 London Marathon and woke up in a St John Ambulance.

The 35-year-old, who was treated for dehydration and heat exhaustion, has now signed up for the Great North Run in September as a way of saying thank you for the care she was given.

Caroline said: “I went in all guns blazing and forgot to take on water and nutrition along the route.

“I collapsed and the next thing I knew I was in an ambulance surrounded by volunteers throwing ice over me.

“It was terrifying and I grabbed hold of the hand of the volunteer for reassurance.

“I was incoherent and started to panic as I couldn’t control my body. I was shaking frantically and the volunteers worked together to try to cool me down with bags of ice and give me drinks to replenish my lost fluids.

“One kind first-aider even managed to contact my friends who were there to support me. When they arrived I was so happy and relieved to have them there.”

Caroline, who now lives in Wimbledon, south-west London, was then taken to hospital before she was released later the same night.

Since her traumatic experience she has run a further two marathons and ran the Great North Run in 2013.

She said: “I have never been able to thank St John Ambulance enough for the help of their wonderful volunteers who probably saved my life that day.

“I decided to join Team St John Ambulance and run the Great North Run again this year to support this charity and hope to raise lots of money to invest in more lifesavers.”