End of weekly bin collections

News: Bringing you news 24-hours a day.
News: Bringing you news 24-hours a day.
0
Have your say

WEEKLY wheelie bin collections are to be axed in Sheffield - saving the council £2.44 million a year.

Rubbish will be collected from homes once a fortnight, rather than once a week. Free garden waste collections will end.

Sheffield Council said it must enforce the changes - which could come as soon as early April - or make further cuts to other services.

Union leaders claimed up to 40 binmen’s jobs could be at risk - and warned they may take industrial action if redundancies are compulsory.

Sheffield Council’s cabinet agreed the proposals at a meeting yesterday afternoon, and the plans will be brought before full council for final approval in March. The council said it will now look to ‘enhance’ recycling services - but has not yet given firm details.

Sheffield Council cabinet member for environment, Coun Leigh Bramall, said: “Due to Government cuts, the council has significant money to save from the waste budget over the next two years.

“Saving millions in the waste service will allow the council to protect services for those that most need help. I believe that’s the right choice, and I think Sheffield people will understand and support that.”

The decision follows a review of the waste service by councillors, which recommended reducing bin collections and ending free green waste collections, plus a public consultation exercise in which people were invited to give suggestions about council cuts.

Peter Davies of the GMB trade union, which represents binmen working for Sheffield Council contractor Veolia, said: “Reducing bin collections to fortnightly could mean up to 40 job losses. The proposals are the council’s worst-kept secret.”

***************

RESIDENTS reacted with worry today to the news weekly wheelie bin collections are to be axed in Sheffield.

Jill Fitzpatrick, aged 39, lives with husband Martin, 43, on Kenwell Drive, Bradway, and has three sons aged 12, nine and one. She fears fortnightly rubbish collections will not be enough.

“I’ve got a baby with nappies, and they’re going to be in the bin longer,” she said. “The smells will attract pests. It won’t be too bad in winter but in summer it’ll cause problems.

“If it creates more problems with vermin that will cost money to sort out. I don’t think many people will think it’s a good thing.

“We try to recycle as much as we can, but the paper and cardboard gets full in no time. We could do with one bigger bin, with different compartments.”

Mick Daniels, chair of Brushes TARA in Firth Park, said fortnightly collections would be “alright for some” - but could lead to more fly-tipping of excess rubbish.

“Bigger families won’t have enough space in their bins, and people can’t always get to recycling banks or the tip,” he said.

And Dore resident John Gisborne said: “I’m very keen on recyling - and I know if I’m struggling, with the bins I have, others must be.”

Sheffield Council cabinet member for environment, Coun Leigh Bramall, said the change is to be made despite the offer of Government funding to preserve weekly collections - because ministers are offering only enough cash for one year, while at the same time asking councils to commit to the weekly service for five.

He said: “I’m extremely disappointed that despite announcing they would be ‘saving’ weekly bin collections, the Government have yet to commit a penny towards protecting Sheffield’s weekly black bin service.”

***************

SHEFFIELD Council is the only local authority in South Yorkshire still to collect rubbish weekly - and hopes a move to fortnightly collections could save £2.44m a year.

But the GMB trade union fears the change could also lead to 40 binmen working for contractor Veolia losing their jobs.

Sheffield organiser Peter Davies said: “There are between 100 and 200 binmen, and reducing bin collections to fortnightly could mean up to 40 job losses.

“We hope there will be proper consultation. If there is anything Draconian like compulsory redundancies that could trigger industrial action.”

Sheffield Council said weekly collection of black bin waste costs around £9.4m a year. Most is then disposed of through the Bernard Road incinerator, at a cost of around £11.8m a year.

But the amount of black bin waste is declining - down 14 per cent since 2005.

And the council says 58 per cent of residents who responded to consultation as part of the waste review said their black bins were half full or less each week.

Council bosses, who need to save £57m in total next year, say there will be support and help for residents during the changes. And households with lots of occupants, who may struggle to cope, could be given extra capacity.

The authority also plans to save £1.5m from axing free green bin and sack collections.

Some 41 per cent of people who answered consultation have never even used the service for lawn clippings and tree prunings, and 12 per cent have used it only once or twice.

But Coun Shaffaq Mohammed, leader of Sheffield Council’s opposition Lib Dem group, said: “Regardless of your opinion on black bin collections, Labour’s decision to reduce collections to fortnightly - and cease a key recycling service at the same time - is a recipe for disaster.

“What is also clear is this prolonged consultation period was a sham. The decision had been made weeks ago.”

The council has not yet revealed its immediate plans for recycling - having stopped flexible collection using blue bins and boxes halfway through implementation. Plans could include the introduction of a single bin for all recyclables in future.

***************

Bins in numbers:

£57m - the amount Sheffield Council needs to save from next year’s budget

£2.44m - the amount that could be saved by changing to fortnightly collections.

£1.5m - the sum that could be saved by ending free green waste collections

40 - the number of binmen’s jobs at risk

***************

Julie Hall, 47, who lives off Barnsley Road, Sheffield, said: “The changes sound okay to me but that’s because where I live we don’t use all the bins anyway.”

Nicholas Lacey, 53, of Broomhall, said: “The bin collections are rubbish. I think they should be every week. Money is the council’s problem. I pay my council tax and all the rest of it.”

Cheryl Moss, of Dinnington, said: “I don’t think they should stop the green bins for garden waste because I get a lot of use out of that, other things wouldn’t be the same.”

Care home worker Ian Ellingham, 55, of Handsworth, said: “I’m more interested in the green bin because when I do garden I have a lot of stuff. It would be useful to keep that.”

Head cashier Joanne Carson, 41, of Gleadless said: “I think it is better because we don’t really use all our bins.”

RESIDENTS reacted with worry today to the news weekly wheelie bin collections are to be axed in Sheffield.

Jill Fitzpatrick, aged 39, lives with husband Martin, 43, on Kenwell Drive, Bradway, and has three sons aged 12, nine and one. She fears fortnightly rubbish collections will not be enough.

“I’ve got a baby with nappies, and they’re going to be in the bin longer,” she said.

“The smells will attract pests. It won’t be too bad in winter but in summer it’ll cause problems.

“If it creates more problems with vermin that will cost money to sort out. I don’t think many people will think it’s a good thing.

“We try to recycle as much as we can, but the paper and cardboard gets full in no time. We could do with one bigger bin, with different compartments.”

Mick Daniels, chair of Brushes TARA in Firth Park, said fortnightly collections would be “alright for some” - but could lead to more fly-tipping of excess rubbish.

“Bigger families won’t have enough space in their bins and people can’t always get to recycling banks or the tip,” he said.

And Dore resident John Gisborne said: “I’m very keen on recycling - and I know if I’m struggling, with the bins I have, others must be.”

Sheffield Council cabinet member for environment, Coun Leigh Bramall, said the change is to be made despite the offer of Government funding to preserve weekly collections - because ministers are offering only enough cash for one year, while at the same time asking councils to commit to the weekly service for five.

He said: “I’m extremely disappointed that despite announcing they would be ‘saving’ weekly bin collections, the Government have yet to commit a penny towards protecting Sheffield’s weekly black bin service.”

SHEFFIELD Council is the only local authority in South Yorkshire still to collect rubbish weekly and hopes a move to fortnightly collections could save £2.44m a year.

But the GMB trade union fears the change could also lead to 40 binmen working for contractor Veolia losing their jobs.

Sheffield organiser Peter Davies said: “There are between 100 and 200 binmen, and reducing bin collections to fortnightly could mean up to 40 job losses.

“We hope there will be proper consultation. If there is anything Draconian like compulsory redundancies that could trigger industrial action.”

Sheffield Council said weekly collection of black bin waste costs around £9.4m a year. Most is then disposed of through the Bernard Road incinerator, at a cost of around £11.8m a year.

But the amount of black bin waste is declining - down 14 per cent since 2005.

And the council says 58 per cent of residents who responded to consultation as part of the waste review said their black bins were half full or less each week.

Council bosses, who need to save £57m in total next year, say there will be support and help for residents during the changes. And households with lots of occupants, who may struggle to cope, could be given extra capacity.

The authority also plans to save £1.5m from axing free green bin and sack collections.

Some 41 per cent of people who answered consultation have never even used the service for lawn clippings and tree prunings, and 12 per cent have used it only once or twice.

But Coun Shaffaq Mohammed, leader of Sheffield Council’s opposition Lib Dem group, said: “Regardless of your opinion on black bin collections, Labour’s decision to reduce collections to fortnightly - and cease a key recycling service at the same time - is a recipe for disaster.

“What is also clear is this prolonged consultation period was a sham. The decision had been made weeks ago.”

The council has not yet revealed its immediate plans for recycling - having stopped flexible collection using blue bins and boxes halfway through implementation. Plans could include the introduction of a single bin for all recyclables in future.

Julie Hall, 47

Barnsley Road, Sheffield

“The changes sound okay to me but that’s because where I live we don’t use all the bins anyway.”

Nicholas Lacey, 53

of Broomhall

“The bin collections are rubbish. I think they should be every week. Money is the council’s problem. I pay my council tax and all the rest of it.”

Cheryl Moss

of Dinnington

“I don’t think they should stop the green bins for garden waste because I get a lot of use out of that, other things wouldn’t be the same.”

Ian Ellingham, 55

of Handsworth

“I’m more interested in the green bin because when I do garden I have a lot of stuff. It would be useful to keep that.”

Joanne Carson, 41

of Gleadless

“I think it is better because we don’t really use all our bins.”