School shortlisted for science prize

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A SHEFFIELD school has been shortlisted for a prestigious science prize after putting forward a proposal to increase motivation and enthusiasm for chemistry and raise success rates.

Ecclesfield School was selected for the Rolls-Royce Science Prize, which rewards promotion of science and engineering in schools by encouraging and rewarding inspirational science teaching.

The school has been awarded a £1,000 special merit award for being shortlisted.

Aidan Forsythe, curriculum leader for science at the school, said: “I am delighted the effort and determination of staff within the Ecclesfield Science faculty has been recognised with this award.

“The chemistry team is delighted and the award will be used to further engage students whilst allowing the school to continue making teaching and learning within the subject a rewarding and relevant experience, both in terms of life and career choices for Ecclesfield students.”

More than 2,000 schools enter the competition each year.

Ecclesfield will find out in July if it is one of nine finalists. Schools which reach the final nine will receive a further £5,000 to help implement their proposals.

They will then compete for the main prize of £15,000 and the chance to spend a day with the Red Arrows display team.

Helen Bishop, Rolls-Royce, head of community investment, said: “Rolls-Royce has long advocated science teaching in schools.

“For over seven years the Rolls-Royce Science Prize has encouraged teachers to improve science teaching and inspire children with exciting, intellectually stimulating and relevant science education.

“Ecclesfield School has risen to the challenge. I wish them the very best in the competition.”

Rolls-Royce awards £120,000 a year in cash prizes to schools in the UK which enter the competition through the Science Learning Centre Network.

Yvonne Baker, director of the National Science Learning Centre, said: “Ecclesfield has come up with an innovative idea to develop its staff to help enhance science teaching.”

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