‘Positive culture’ at Doncaster school whose ex-head, Julie Beech, was banned for altering tests

Sunnyfields Primary School Headteacher, Julie Beech, 51, has been banned from the profession after admitting to altering pupils' answers in SATs exams last year.
Sunnyfields Primary School Headteacher, Julie Beech, 51, has been banned from the profession after admitting to altering pupils' answers in SATs exams last year.
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Ofsted has praised work to turn around a school whose former headteacher was banned for altering exam answers.

Julie Beech, former headteacher at Sunnyfields Primary School, Sunnyfields, was banned from the profession in May after admitting she altered answers on pupils’ SATs exams.

Her replacement, David Richardson is praised in the school’s latest Ofsted report, but it warns the school still requires improvement.

Mrs Beech admitted altering five maths tests and three spelling tests in year 6 exams in 2014.

The new report from the government’s education watchdog says Mr Richardson has quickly established a positive culture for learning following a period of ‘significant turbulence and staff change’.

It states: “As a result, staff work well as a team and are ambitious for further development. Morale is high. However, there is still much to be done to ensure good outcomes for pupils.”

The report says leadership and management, quality of teaching and achievement of pupils require improvement.

It rated behaviour and safety of pupils, and early years provision, as good.

It says the school needs to improve the quality of teaching to speed up pupils’ progress and raise standards in writing and mathematics.

It also needs to strengthen leadership and management by ensuring there are not too many priorities for improvement and they have clear and measurable targets.

It says children make good progress and a strong start to their learning in the early years. Pupils enjoy reading and achieve well through school. Pupils are well behaved and feel safe. They enjoy school and take good care of each other.

The report said parents are strongly supportive of the school and appreciate the good range of information and support they receive.

The curriculum is saod tp well planned and contributes well to pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development and their health and well-being.

However, inspectors warned pupils do not make consistently good progress in writing and mathematics and teachers’ expectations for their pupils are not always high enough.

They said teachers do not always make effective enough use of marking and feedback to enable pupils to improve their own work, while pupils do not always present their work accurately.

Mr Richardson, in post since February, said the school was focusing on areas highlighted by Ofsted and working to turn around weaknesses highlighted.

He said: “It is a school that is consistently improving. We are working hard to make sure the education and teaching is consistently good.

“There is a clear priority to improve and we are focusing on the issues in the report.”