PICTURES: Children get closer to nature at Peak District National Trust

Felicity LeGros (4) keeps her eyes on a garden snail
Felicity LeGros (4) keeps her eyes on a garden snail
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“We sometimes meet children who’ve never seen a cow or a duck before,” said Zoe Stevens. “One child asked about a stream: ‘Does that water keep going at night? Does it get turned off?’”

Zoe works for the National Trust in Peak District and one of her summer holiday tasks is to encourage families and children to explore the local countryside, and meet the creatures who live there.

Ruth Chesters, Euan McIntyre (5) and Max Killen (12) playing pooh sticks at Ilam Park

Ruth Chesters, Euan McIntyre (5) and Max Killen (12) playing pooh sticks at Ilam Park

“Have you held one of those before?” she asked a toddler as a garden snail slithered over her fingers.

Playing outdoors was a big part of Zoe’s childhood, she said. “I didn’t have a computer. Now children have all these indoor activities using a screen, but we say there are lots of simple things you can do outdoors that are free, give you exercise and are brilliant fun.”

Organising a snail race, hunting for bugs, climbing a huge hill, holding a scary beast, and building a den are among the ‘50 Things To Do Before You’re 11 3/4’ that Zoe and her colleagues are promoting in a free scrapbook that families and children can pick up from National Trust properties.

The aim is to help reverse the decline in outdoor play among British children. A report by the National Trust found that less than one in ten modern children regularly play in ‘wild places’, whereas most youngsters played in their ‘local patch of nature’ when today’s parents were children.

Chloe Horne (6) tree climbing at Longshaw

Chloe Horne (6) tree climbing at Longshaw

The ‘Natural Childhood’ report adds that playing outdoors ‘exposed to nature’ helps children lose weight and improve their health, and also improves mental health and social and academic skills. “Children who learn outdoors know more, understand more, feel better, behave better, work more cooperatively and are physically healthier,” said report author Stephen Moss.

But as Zoe pointed out, it’s also a lot more fun to climb trees and make mud pies than sit inside all day. Over the last three years, Zoe reckons at least 20,000 children have taken up the challenges in their ‘Wild Adventure Scrapbooks’ around the Peak District.

Families are encouraged to tick off their adventures in their own local parks and gardens as well as at National Trust properties, and although Zoe herself prefers keeping a scrapbook, there’s even a website and app for those who want to combine screen and wild time.

Researchers have found that if children have fun in the natural world before they reach secondary school, they’ll be much more interested in protecting the environment when they’re adults. David Attenborough said: “No one will protect what they don’t care about, and no one will care about what they have never experienced.”

Zoe Stevens from the National Trust and Max Killen examine an earthworm

Zoe Stevens from the National Trust and Max Killen examine an earthworm

Outdoor games are ideal for school holidays, Zoe reckoned. “You can play pooh sticks every day, and it will still be exciting, and if you go bug hunting you’ll find something different every time.” Families can pick up a scrapbook and take part in their own time or have fun with staff at Longshaw’s Moorland Discovery Centre from Thursday to Sunday every week.

People over 11 3/4 are allowed to take part too. Parents can often get very competitive with pooh sticks, Zoe said, and children often find their grandparents are expert stone skimmers and grass trumpet makers.

“One grandmother said to me: ‘We’ve been so busy playing pooh sticks and building dens that they haven’t asked for their iPads all day’.”

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Martha LeGros (6) blowing though a 'grass trumpet' watched by her grandad Greg Stott

Martha LeGros (6) blowing though a 'grass trumpet' watched by her grandad Greg Stott

Chloe Horne (6) and brother Isaac (2) help dad Gareth stream dip at Longshaw

Chloe Horne (6) and brother Isaac (2) help dad Gareth stream dip at Longshaw