Mummy’s the word!

Balby Carr Community Sports and Science College staff and pupils dressed up in various costumes as part of an enrichment day. Our picture shows staff, back row, from left, Rachel Clarke, Lynn Cooper, Luke Atkinson, Pat Littlewood, Natasha Pearson, Chris Dutton, Helen Cook and Chelsea Branson; front, Matthew McDonald.
Balby Carr Community Sports and Science College staff and pupils dressed up in various costumes as part of an enrichment day. Our picture shows staff, back row, from left, Rachel Clarke, Lynn Cooper, Luke Atkinson, Pat Littlewood, Natasha Pearson, Chris Dutton, Helen Cook and Chelsea Branson; front, Matthew McDonald.
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Oh mummy! History teacher Matthew McDonald wrapped himself in bandages to come to school dressed as an Egyptian mummy.

But he did not look out of place at Balby Car School - as many of the staff were doing something similar.

After all, head of PE Rachel Clarke was looking a dead ringer for Cleopatra, while head of history Pat Littlewood appeared to have walked straight out of an Edwardian scene.

In fact, the History and PE departments were all dressed up as characters from times gone by as part of a plan to get more pupils interested in the past.

The event, called an enrichment day, saw both departments getting into the spirit of things.

The PE teachers arranged games which have been played throughout history including tic-tac-toe, musical chairs and fencing.

History staff told about the historical context of the games.

It was not just the teachers who joined in with the fancy dress though.

Most of the Year 7 pupils at the specialist sports and science college also took part, ditching their school uniforms for the prospect of more eccentric threads.

Several Roman soldier costumes were to be seen.

The bandaged Mr McDonald said: “We were working with history and fundamentally looking to bring history to life, to engage, enthuse and inspire young people with the thrill, knowledge and love of history.

“The day created a unique learning opportunity for our students in which they were able to engage, have fun and learn.

“This activity raised achievement and attainment, not just in the subject of history but throughout the whole school.”

He added: “When I first arrived for lessons in my costume, I don’t think many of the pupils knew who I was until I started speaking!

“Those bandages were certainly not very comfortable, and I don’t think I would want to wear them all the time!

“But it was great fun, all in the name of education, and I would love to do it again.”